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khcrafter
May 25th, 2010, 06:32 PM
Hi, I'm new to the forum as well as skating (skated as a child and maybe young adulthood)... any way...

I'm now in my late 50's, very overweight (ok, a lot overweight)... I've been reading and looking at various posts; and I did look at the Riedell Citizen 111 and Zone 135. I also went to a local sporting store and looked at Chicago skates that were $45 and tried them on, the top of the skate seemed very, very stiff, and I think they were vinyl so i was worried since they are a "high top" that I'd get blisters on my legs.

Someone kindly pointed out that if I was over 230# I should get harder wheels at 97A or more... also, I was concerned about the "plate or chassis?" being able to withstand my weight.

The Riedells that I've seen online dont mention the wheel hardness and the plate says its nylon, again will this hold up without breaking or cracking?

I can see the varying price ranges, and would like to not feel a need to replace my skates in 2 months if I get in to this, so am curious what's a good beginner price range (I really think the $45 experience would not be a good one)...
Oh, and I have an area that is flat and concrete (parking lot) to practice on as well as my patio for not looking like an idiot in front of an audience). On the "lower priced" skates, am I able to change wheels if I did want to go to a skating rink? and if so, what wheels would I get. ... also, I've seen some wheels in my favorite color ... purple... is there some available that meets my needs?

sorry for the long post, Thanks for any and all suggestions.

Reserector
May 25th, 2010, 07:02 PM
My experience with nylon plates is limited to the ROCK skates. The plate on those did not hold up to my weight (over 200) without bowing like a swaybak horse. They also flexed badly, not allowing the suspension to turn properly.

I now use aluminum plates at the rink and outdoors with no problems. Both of my skates use Sure-Grip plates. XK-4 DA45 indoors. Super-X outdoors.
There are plenty of others to choose from of course.

Leather is much better than vinyl for outdoor use because of the potential heat involved. You may consider a low-cut boot for the same reason. High boots (artistic boots) offer better ankle support, if that is a requirement for you.

Using wheel hardness as a point of comparison, look for 78A to 85A range for asphault and concrete, and up into the 90s for rink floors and finished concrete. That is just my personal rule of thumb. There are more factors to consider when it comes to wheels. Hubs/no hubs, extra tall, narrow or wide, specialty, and so on.

One thing I strongly suggest is a set of pads, starting with wrist guards. Odds are you WILL fall. At age 50, and overweight, gravity is not kind. Better to be prepared and live to skate another day.

MANY_SkatingDave
May 25th, 2010, 08:20 PM
Hi Again,

Again I recommend you start indoors, which is why I didn't include a helmet in needed safety equipment for a Heavy Weight. If you are dead set on outdoors get a helmet and elbow pads and protect that rear and back. BTW make sure you have a back up buddy plan if you take a hard spill.

I have known several that have used their hardwood floors indoors to skate yet I don't recommend it.

Worry a little about being a dork at an indoor rink. Just pick the times for the little kids or uncrowded sessions and you can dork away till you say good bye to dorkhood. The advantage is that you are with people and have the rink as your safety buddy.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave

Armadillo
May 26th, 2010, 12:07 AM
+1 on the suggestion to start out indoors.
Once you feel fairly comfortable at the rink, get a set of softer outdoor wheels and find a really smooth outdoor spot to test. Get used to outdoors gradually, going gradually from the best really smooth spots to the more realistically rougher trails. At some point you will likely realize the outdoor skating demands a better degree of optimization than just switching wheels. If you are still eager to keep rolling outdoors at this point, THEN and ONLY THEN would I suggest a 2nd pair of outdoor only skates be purchased.

-Armadillo

Bill in Houston
May 26th, 2010, 04:49 PM
I'm now in my late 50's, very overweight (ok, a lot overweight)... What, like 200 lbs or like 400?

Thanks for any and all suggestions.Whatever you do, before you skate a single step, get some wrist guards, and wear them any time you put on skates.

Start indoors. Once you feel good there, you can think about outdoors.

You are old enough to know that you should never worry about what other people think of you. Skate whenever and wherever you want, and don't worry who is watching.

Good luck! Have fun!

Armadillo
May 27th, 2010, 12:14 PM
What, like 200 lbs or like 400?

Whatever you do, before you skate a single step, get some wrist guards, and wear them any time you put on skates.

Start indoors. Once you feel good there, you can think about outdoors.

You are old enough to know that you should never worry about what other people think of you. Skate whenever and wherever you want, and don't worry who is watching.

Good luck! Have fun!

Good advice. And make sure the wrist guards are the strong ones that go up past your wrist a few inches and capture your wrist with hard plastic on top -AND- bottom with strong Velcro cinch straps.
Start learning how to keep those knees bent at all times, especially if you are heading outdoors!

-Armadillo