PDA

View Full Version : Quads for Marathon Racing


Dcrozier
June 29th, 2010, 02:42 AM
I know this type of posting has been asked before, but I'm having a hard time trying to read through all the different threads....I'm hoping some can point me in the right direction of a shop that can help me build quad skates for distance racing.

I've sunk about $600 on two different styles of inlines and I just don't have the ankle for it. I really would like to particpate in a few marathons in quads. Is there any shop that I can work with to help me build a proper outdoor speed set up? Axles in the right position, etc... I can't figure out through all the posting if everyone is just building their own skates or if they're working with someone. If there no shop, I would be willing to pay someone to help build up a pair.

Thanks!

Darren
Philly

Armadillo
June 29th, 2010, 06:55 AM
I know this type of posting has been asked before, but I'm having a hard time trying to read through all the different threads....I'm hoping some can point me in the right direction of a shop that can help me build quad skates for distance racing.

I've sunk about $600 on two different styles of inlines and I just don't have the ankle for it. I really would like to participate in a few marathons in quads. Is there any shop that I can work with to help me build a proper outdoor speed set up? Axles in the right position, etc... I can't figure out through all the posting if everyone is just building their own skates or if they're working with someone. If there no shop, I would be willing to pay someone to help build up a pair.

Thanks!

Darren
Philly

Hi Darren,

I just got back from a 10-mile night skate workout (on a lighted path). I too am training for marathons on quads, but my 1st race will only be a half marathon on July 25th. You may have read some of my threads here on SLF about outdoor skate builds. I have recently begun offering my services for custom outdoor skate builds to SLF members. Please PM me for more details. I am also in the process of building myself a new pair of outdoor long distance racing quad skates, so I am well focused on the exact issues that you would want handled for your own marathon quad skates.

The three main build priorities as I see them are => exceptional wheels, low weight, and super foot comfort. I do not advise using normal skate boots, as they do not offer enough sole cushioning. So, your first and toughest challenge is to find a decent lightweight shoe in the 8-12oz. weight range. After that, you need to decide what plates to use. I advise nylon plates for their lower weight and better vibration absorbing characteristics. Finally your wheel choices are very limited, as all the best wheels are no longer in production. However, I do still have access to a few sets of these top performing wheels. So, send me a PM for more details.

-Armadillo

peter
June 30th, 2010, 03:30 PM
You can do a marathon in many different boots - my son did it in roller hockey quads (in fcat he did 45 miles last year in 4hrs 15. But he would absolutely agree with Armadilo about comfort. And a lot of this is to do with getting the right wheels for the surface you are skating on.

And he is finally coming round to the idea of lighter boots and plates. :)

yedaki_de
July 2nd, 2010, 10:12 PM
I am very pleased with the Quadracer-Leather from Bont. They offer not much cushening in the sole, but maybe you dont need it. Depending of the surface you are on, it might be fine.
You have not to tighten the shoe up so much, bec. of the stability of the sole and the leather is rearly smooth but strong.

My trainingslog translated (http://translate.google.de/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.inlinemap.net%2Fuser%2Fquad_outdoor&sl=de&tl=en&hl=&ie=UTF-8) ...strange text came out...

I do often marathon-distances or more, and since mid 2008 always with the Quadracer-shoe. The comfort of those is (at least for me) sufficient. They are featherlight and you can mould the counters with a heatgun to fit your feet.

Johannes

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4016/4584961862_aa90a7214f.jpg

pvasques
July 26th, 2010, 09:44 PM
Hi There!

New to the site

Just did a 28 mile run in Boston with Riedell R3 boots, free ride 72 mm long board wheels shopped and a powerdyne plate, heavy set up, lots of vibration, good speed!

Any suggestions

Armadillo
July 27th, 2010, 03:42 AM
Hi There!

New to the site

Just did a 28 mile run in Boston with Riedell R3 boots, free ride 72 mm long board wheels shopped and a powerdyne plate, heavy set up, lots of vibration, good speed!

Any suggestions

Big narrow wheels => good speed (70+mm). High rebound urethane in the 82-84A firmness range are best for decent asphalt roads.

Metal plates screw mounted to hard leather soles are not so good => major vibrations.

What firmness are the "free ride" 72mm wheels? Are they side set, or did you cut them narrower?

To eliminate the most vibrations with outdoor quads, I advise use of nylon plates, and a flat, foam soled athletic shoes with good lateral support.
Basketball, soccer, baseball, cross trainer and a few other styles can work well.

Much info already has been posted here at SLF & available via search.

-Armadillo

Iggy
July 27th, 2010, 03:54 PM
To eliminate the most vibrations with outdoor quads, I advise use of nylon plates, and a flat, foam soled athletic shoes with good lateral support.
Basketball, soccer, baseball, cross trainer and a few other styles can work well.

-Armadillo

To be perfectly honest, I felt very minimal difference in vibration between my plastic Omegas and my magnesium Marathons. Both mounted to the same soccer cleat. And even the mag Marathons/soccer cleat vs. my current Omega/Risport build felt about the same to me. And the Risport boots have a thick insole and the cleats have no padding at all inside. The only significant difference I noticed with the Omega/soccer cleat setup was the insane amount flex. I'm sure a stiffener plate would fix that, but that would just make the vibration even worse.

Now when I had my aluminum Marathons for outdoor, there was noticeably more vibration compared to the magnesium Marathons. I suspect cushion selection played a part in this, but I'm not sure.

Armadillo
July 28th, 2010, 06:48 AM
Magnesium alloy is normally stiffer than aluminum alloy, but cushion setup can compensate too. Flex helps damp vibrations a bit as well.

-Armadillo

AussieScott
July 29th, 2010, 01:15 PM
Most everyone I race with runs with metal plates outdoors.
I race plastic myself but I also run metal.
I'll be running all metal again soon hopefully.
Suspension setup of the plate will help with bumps also.

Mount it with the front wheels as far forward as possible and the rear axle around the middle of the ankle bone or 5mm forward of your outside ankle bone. No Toe Stop on the front unless you want to kiss the ground. You will get better push and greater stability when passing over rough territory.

Boots make sure they fit like a glove.
You can always find something to pad the sole out with if need be.
Maybe 2 inner soles per boot if you need it.

Wheels well yeah it really depends on the surfaces you skate.
Mid 80's would be a good compromise for wheel hardness based on the surface constantly changing.
Basically the harder the better as you will roll more. It just depends how much comfort you need. Bigger is better for sure especially in a marathon.
Narrower wheels will be better as there is less surface contact so less rolling resistance.
I am wanting to work on a narrow wheel that sticks out as far as a normal 44mm indoor wheel for extra stability. I personally find the narrower wheels a little less user friendly but given time you will adjust.

All the best,
Scott.

masmojo
July 30th, 2010, 03:20 PM
Darren, I don't want to discourage you, but I have to ask what type of inlines were you trying before, Because I have skated in-lines and quads and I can say definatively that the average in-line is much easier outdoors and generally MUCH easier on the ankles!! That said, with either quads or In-line you are not going to be able to jump on them and roll 2 or even maybe one mile comfortably right out of the chute! your Back an especially leg and ankle muscles/ tendons will take time to build strength and it's not a quick process!! It might be a little easier if you are already in good shape and physically active, but there is a process that has to be worked through.

I thought I was a pretty strong skater, due to sessioning at the rink 2 to 3 times a week for the last 5 or 6 months, BUT 45 minutes on my quads on a fairly smooth bike trail and I was TOAST!! Well, actually I was O.K. but my legs and ankles were using muscles that I guess I just don't work much skating indoors! Add to this that once your legs get tired the muscles tend to not want to work anymore and they kind of lock up! This is fine for indoors, because it's smooth and you can just kind of skate over to your table and sit down, but if you are outside and this happens, you might be 1/2 a mile from your car or house or whatever, so you still gotta keep going and every little road undulation suddenly wants to throw you on your butt because as your muscle get tired and tighten up they loose their suppleness and ability to make fine adjustments to the terrain!! :(

I personally find this a challenge, because I like quads and Part of why I am skating is for the physical challenge, but it could be disheartening for someone who was not expecting or ready for it!!;)