PDA

View Full Version : Require help selecting my Quad Outdoor


anniemanuja
February 20th, 2011, 10:44 PM
Hello All

Could you please provide me a price quote for the following quad outdoor skate

1) Atom Poison Wheels (should be able to change wheels)
2) Bone Red Bearings
3) Speed & Jam skate boot
4) Front toe stop

Thank you

Annie

anniemanuja
February 20th, 2011, 10:51 PM
Also how is the following link to start of with?

http://www.theskateauthority.com/Labeda-G-80-Limited-Edition-Quad-Roller-Skates-p/qs-13.htm

Gero
February 20th, 2011, 11:11 PM
Hello All

Could you please provide me a price quote for the following quad outdoor skate

1) Atom Poison Wheels (should be able to change wheels)
2) Bone Red Bearings
3) Speed & Jam skate boot
4) Front toe stop

Thank you

Annie


Hi Annie,

what do you want to do with your skates outdoor?

In my opinion the Poisen wheels are much too hard for skating on non concrete outdoor surfaces, Bones Reds are open, better is to have closed greased bearings. The Labeda boot will be to hard for you in any way for outdoor skating, it won't absorb the vibrations of the roads.

But... Front Toe Stop is a wise decision... :wink:

Cheers from Germany

Gero

anniemanuja
February 20th, 2011, 11:20 PM
Thanks for you reply!

Any suggestion for Quad Outdoors for

1) Boot (I prefer low boot)
2) Wheel
3) Plate
4) Bearings

Also any suggestiong of website from where I can customize and buy in USA?

Thanks for all the help.

Annie

anniemanuja
February 20th, 2011, 11:33 PM
I need outdoor quads for just start skating on trails nearby. I use to do speed skating back then so will definetely would love to own a good set of wheels than any slow mushy ones.

anniemanuja
February 21st, 2011, 12:57 AM
http://www.lowpriceskates.com/r3flatout.aspx

ursle
February 21st, 2011, 01:23 AM
The hubs on radar flat-out wheels are made from Martian rubber trees and melt when it's above 98.7 degrees.
I think you should pick up a good used speed boot, used metal plate and a set of roll-line helium wheels(great hub 80a 64mm) or hope for some velocity race wheels to show, (they come with bearings), wait on the bearing until you get the plate (7-8mm)
But if you are strapped for time and want a new package, deal with Nathan http://www.derbysmack.com/new-products-en.html
Honest, fast and friendly.

Iggy
February 21st, 2011, 03:04 AM
Hello All

Could you please provide me a price quote for the following quad outdoor skate

1) Atom Poison Wheels (should be able to change wheels)
2) Bone Red Bearings
3) Speed & Jam skate boot
4) Front toe stop

Thank you

Annie

I would second the vote for the Roll Line Helium or Hydrogen wheels. Velocity Race wheels are definitely the way to go IF you can find them. I really don't know about the Poisons, but I don't think they're really an outdoor wheel so much as a soft indoor wheel.

The Reds bearings are good. Great bearing for the money. They're not open as previously mentioned. Then have a rubber shield on one side (shield or seal? I always get those mixed up :redface:) so dirt does not get in them.

If you're gonna beat on these good, I would also suggest a used boot. Keep an eye on the For Sale threads on here. Probably any low cut boot would do good. I'd recommend a boot with a flat sole so you don't have a heel tipping your weight forward, but that's just my personal preference.

As for the front toe stop......very bad idea for outdoor. They get in the way and make it way too easy to get it caught on something outdoor and trip you. Plus they are not an efficient means for stopping outdoor (or indoor for that matter really). My opinion....NTS (no toe stop) plate and just do a t-stop. Some people may recommend a plate with a toe stop and turn the plate around backwards and use the toe stop as a heel stop. I've tried it and didn't like it. Too easy to dig the heel stop in too hard and stop your skate dead and end up falling on your face.

My recommendation:

Boot: 395 or 195. My 395s were pretty nice for outdoor, but I didn't like the ankle height. They do have a small wedged heel, but it's not enough to pitch your weight forward at all.

Plate: Sure Grip Marathon

Wheels: Velocity Race if you can find a set. Roll Line Helium/Hydrogen if you can't.

Bearings: Bones Reds

Iggy
February 21st, 2011, 03:08 AM
One more comment regarding plate sizing.....

IMO, a plate at least one, possibly two sizes down from the manufacturer's recommended size is good for outdoor. Mount the plate so the front wheels are as far forward as they can go and the back wheels are right around your inside ankle bone. This setup allows for the skates to roll over stones and sticks very easily.

anniemanuja
February 21st, 2011, 07:45 AM
Thank you so much for your sugeestion.

I am still new to skatelog...can you please tell me where can I keep checking sale?

Also, do you someone who can custom build skates for me?

Thank you

Annie

anniemanuja
February 21st, 2011, 07:48 AM
Also, how about Krypto 70mm? Heard a lot about Velocity Race but touch to get your hands on. How will you compare Kyrpto 70mm to Helium and Hydrogen Wheels?

Gero
February 21st, 2011, 08:17 AM
Also, how about Krypto 70mm? Heard a lot about Velocity Race but touch to get your hands on. How will you compare Kyrpto 70mm to Helium and Hydrogen Wheels?

The Route 70 are fat (no Hub, just oldschool full-material), heavy and much slower than the quick outdoor wheels. These are nice for recreation skating on uneven surfaces, nothing for speed skating or longer distances.

The No1 wheels "Velocity Race" from Pacer are not longer available anywhere, if someone finds them I would order at least 10 sets of them!

Quickest wheel an best choice which is still available is the "Helium" from Roll Line. I have two sets of them and they are really fast and light with the big hub. I love them too.

Cheers

Michael

anniemanuja
February 21st, 2011, 02:51 PM
Thanks Mike thats really helpful info!

Let me start chasing Velocity Race else go for Helium!

Can you please suggest some site/place/person who can help me build a good custom outdoor quad?

I am in Dallas, Texas, USA.

Thanks a lot

Annie

Iggy
February 21st, 2011, 02:58 PM
Gle8 is a member on here and a skate builder. I believe he's in Austin now. Shoot him a PM and he might be able to help you out.

anniemanuja
February 21st, 2011, 11:03 PM
Thanks a lot!!

For some reason I am not able to PM gle8. :(.

Iggy
February 21st, 2011, 11:09 PM
His PM box might be full. Keep trying.

anniemanuja
February 23rd, 2011, 05:52 AM
Thanks Iggy!

Also, wanted to confirm that if my US shoe size is 7..will Riedell 195 size 7 be perfect for me or I need to take one size small/big in it...I mean how is the variation for this boot?

Thanks

Annie

Armadillo
February 23rd, 2011, 09:16 AM
I build custom lightweight outdoor skates that can handle both speed and jam. Few people can build you a skate that does both styles extremely well.

Roll Line Helium and Hydrogen wheels are not durable enough for every day outdoor skating. Their urethane is too thin at one point and they rapidly accumulate deep cuts along this line around the wheel. They are fine for racing and very smooth (stone free) surfaces though.

Bones Reds are fine for outdoor skating and if well greased (not oil) will resist water penetration fairly well.

I suggest that you get a premium nylon plate with either metal or high strength nylon trucks. You will want a plate that gives you maximum wheel clearance too, to allow for for rolling with the larger 70mm & up size wheels, yet still able to make sharp turns without wheels hitting the plate or boot. I suggest a Sure Grip Nova plate with trucks upgraded for better turning as one option.

Your toughest choice is your boot/shoe. I favor the lighter weight soccer shoes for speed, but for jam skating they may not hold up so well. Perhaps a heavier weight & thicker leather soccer shoe could work well for jam and speed. A strong and light Bont boot would handle jam and speed well, if you can afford the price.

A heel stop is the only effective way to stop on hills unless you want to trash your wheels. Either a reversed mount or a clamp-on heel stop will give you this. They can be easily mastered for most effective stopping.
http://i489.photobucket.com/albums/rr259/RRLedford/Panther/IMG_3965.jpg
http://i489.photobucket.com/albums/rr259/RRLedford/Panther/IMG_3924.jpg

I am currently building a new indoor/outdoor racing speed skate using Soccer shoes (269 grams after cleats removed) and PowerTrac plates with suspension optimized for max possible turning, but perhaps not much good for Jam.
http://i489.photobucket.com/albums/rr259/RRLedford/Puma/IMG_3967.jpg
http://i489.photobucket.com/albums/rr259/RRLedford/Puma/IMG_3966-1.jpg

PM me if you want more info; I have some Velocity Race wheels.

-Armadillo

cass38a
February 23rd, 2011, 12:41 PM
Look at this after years of expermintation Dillo is about to build a quality skate set up..................

Come on Dillo you have finally sprung for a decent plate, how about pair it with a Bont or 195.

Iggy
February 23rd, 2011, 03:33 PM
Thanks Iggy!

Also, wanted to confirm that if my US shoe size is 7..will Riedell 195 size 7 be perfect for me or I need to take one size small/big in it...I mean how is the variation for this boot?

Thanks

Annie

I never had a pair of 195s on so I really can't say. I think a size 7 would be good, but I'd wait for someone how has worn them before to answer that.

You will want a plate that gives you maximum wheel clearance too, to allow for for rolling with the larger 70mm & up size wheels, yet still able to make sharp turns without wheels hitting the plate or boot.

-Armadillo

This was the only useful information in your post. And I'm not even gonna ask what's up with the shoe being held on the skate with verlco straps :eek:

I would not recommend soccer cleats for any serious skating. They're great for tooling around at sessions and shuffle skating and stuff, but I would not suggest using them for serious speed or outdoor skating. They make good skate boots (I have a pair of adidas cleats on Marathons that I use for session), but they're not really countered good enough for serious skating IMO.

Armadillo
February 23rd, 2011, 09:09 PM
....

This was the only useful information in your post. And I'm not even gonna ask what's up with the shoe being held on the skate with verlco straps :eek:

Just how many HUNDRED outdoor miles have you rolled on YOUR Roll Line Hydrogen/Helium heels??? A quick examination of them will reveal, if they have rolled much over stones, that they have a 6mm wide ring around the wheel with TEN TIMES more cuts in it than the adjacent urethane. Perhaps you can waste $80 on wheels unsuitable for every day skating, but most others cannot.
Good, don't ask because it is none of your business, and not thread relevant either. Send a PM if you care to.
I would not recommend soccer cleats for any serious skating. They're great for tooling around at sessions and shuffle skating and stuff, but I would not suggest using them for serious speed or outdoor skating. They make good skate boots (I have a pair of adidas cleats on Marathons that I use for session), but they're not really countered good enough for serious skating IMO.

I did not RECOMMEND them either I said I "favored" them for my use, and they were NOT likely to be good as jam skating boot. There are different quality soccer shoes though and some are more solidly built than the ultralight ones, with improved counters too. A lot depends on the weight and strength of the skater.

As I said, selecting your shoe/boot is the toughest choice for an outdoor build, and the second toughest issue is finding good wheels

-Armadillo

Iggy
February 23rd, 2011, 09:25 PM
I'd still recommend the Helium/Hydrogen wheels as the best currently available outdoor wheel. Lightweight, good roll outdoor, and good at handling debris.

And I never said you did recommend using soccer cleats for outdoor. I simply said I wouldn't. I figured since the OP was asking about boots for outdoor I would offer my opinion of soccer cleats for outdoor from my experiences. I'm sure there are soccer cleats built different than mine that may be better suited for outdoor skates. I would still recommend a skate boot though.

Gero
February 23rd, 2011, 09:57 PM
I am the owner of the Riedell 195s, they are really tight to my size, if you are sure you need them I recommend to buy them half a size more than in your normal shoe size.
I am using them just for concrete trails, for normal roads and sidewalks they are to hard on the sole, it's really not confortable to skate longer distances with them.
The Riedell 265 will be the much better boot for outside skating for speed and jam, very confortable on all sides and also for longer distances a dream.

I also have two sets of Roll line Helium in use, one have now around 1300 outdoor miles on streets (mostly Skatenights) without having any problems at all. They are still as fast as in the beginning and lost maybe 1mm of diameter.

The other set is on a different skate for the same use and after around 600 outdoor miles also no problems at all on them.

Armadillo
February 23rd, 2011, 11:42 PM
I am the owner of the Riedell 195s, they are really tight to my size, if you are sure you need them I recommend to buy them half a size more than in your normal shoe size.
I am using them just for concrete trails, for normal roads and sidewalks they are to hard on the sole, it's really not confortable to skate longer distances with them.
The Riedell 265 will be the much better boot for outside skating for speed and jam, very confortable on all sides and also for longer distances a dream.

I also have two sets of Roll line Helium in use, one have now around 1300 outdoor miles on streets (mostly Skatenights) without having any problems at all. They are still as fast as in the beginning and lost maybe 1mm of diameter.

The other set is on a different skate for the same use and after around 600 outdoor miles also no problems at all on them.

Perhaps I just am rolling on some harsher surfaces than you do?
If I rub my finger across my forehead to pick up some skin oil, and then wipe it across my Roll Line Helium wheels, it makes the cuts in the wheels much more clearly visible. In ONLY the zone above and on either side of the RIB which protrudes out from the hub OD do I see way too many cuts into the urethane, which is VERY THIN in this zone.
Without the light oil (or other liquid) coating the surface, these cuts are rather well hidden from view. Check it out.

-Armadillo

Gero
February 24th, 2011, 08:09 AM
Perhaps I just am rolling on some harsher surfaces than you do?
If I rub my finger across my forehead to pick up some skin oil, and then wipe it across my Roll Line Helium wheels, it makes the cuts in the wheels much more clearly visible. In ONLY the zone above and on either side of the RIB which protrudes out from the hub OD do I see way too many cuts into the urethane, which is VERY THIN in this zone.
Without the light oil (or other liquid) coating the surface, these cuts are rather well hidden from view. Check it out.

-Armadillo


Hi Armadillo,

it can be that your surfaces are more rough than mine, I don't know anything about the quality of american roads near the lakes.

Sure, I recognized that there are cuts on the surface of this wheels... like on all other whells I am using outdoors at well. Yes, the urethane on them is not as thick as on other wheels... but... who cares?

They are running fine as on the first day, they are rubbing down very slowly and after 1300 miles on them I can say that they are really durable and they are working excellent for me.

Why shouldn't I give a recommendation for theses wheels? I believe most of the other outdoor skaters will not come to this distance in year or two, maybe not in their lifetime. Beside the not more available Velocity Race this is definatley the fastest outdoor wheel I have ever skated. (I tested around 12-13 sets of different other wheels in the past years)

Cheers from Germany

Gero (who still don't knows why should give skin oil on the wheels to see the cuts better? What does this change?):biggrin:

cass38a
February 24th, 2011, 11:03 AM
Perhaps I just am rolling on some harsher surfaces than you do?
If I rub my finger across my forehead to pick up some skin oil, and then wipe it across my Roll Line Helium wheels, it makes the cuts in the wheels much more clearly visible. In ONLY the zone above and on either side of the RIB which protrudes out from the hub OD do I see way too many cuts into the urethane, which is VERY THIN in this zone.
Without the light oil (or other liquid) coating the surface, these cuts are rather well hidden from view. Check it out.

-Armadillo

Perhaps it is all that work on how your stroke gives you speed..............I am sure you have progressed way past the Double Push and are now hammering the Quadruple push.

If you read the box on the Heliums it specificaly warns that the urethane will not hold up to forhead oil combined with Dillos highly elvolved skating style as shown in this link.

http://www.dillospatentedskatingstride.com (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCxBvxB4-_I)

Gero
February 24th, 2011, 11:46 AM
+ 1
cass!

First read carefully the medical warnings on the wheels boxes to make them last longer...:D

yedaki_de
February 24th, 2011, 10:02 PM
I have heard from one of the 8-zig (http://www.8-zig.de) skaters he had a total loss off the urethane from a Helium wheel during skating. The tire was come off the hub complete. So better to use on good surface, not on harsh berlin-roads...

Johannes

Armadillo
February 25th, 2011, 03:56 AM
I have heard from one of the 8-zig (http://www.8-zig.de) skaters he had a total loss off the urethane from a Helium wheel during skating. The tire was come off the hub complete. So better to use on good surface, not on harsh berlin-roads...

Johannes

When I saw how densely packed and deep the cuts were in my Helium wheels, I was worried that they would separate along the "dotted line" and come right off the hub just as you describe. Since then I have only skated them indoors or for max speed racing outdoors on smoother surfaces. They are good wheels for sure, but BADLY ENGINEERED for handling sharp stones and rougher surface imperfections. The urethane layer is clearly TOO THIN where the hub's urethane locking rib protrudes.


-Armadillo

Armadillo
February 25th, 2011, 04:14 AM
Perhaps it is all that work on how your stroke gives you speed..............I am sure you have progressed way past the Double Push and are now hammering the Quadruple push.

If you read the box on the Heliums it specificaly warns that the urethane will not hold up to forhead oil combined with Dillos highly elvolved skating style as shown in this link.

http://www.dillospatentedskatingstride.com (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCxBvxB4-_I)

I hope that you yourself are not as pathetically lame as this post.
If you can't contribute something useful to a thread, why not just lay off with the weak efforts at character assassination disguised as humor.

The double push is as good as it gets, so I will just let you waste your time and energy on anything else you may imagine is better.

-Armadillo

cass38a
February 25th, 2011, 06:27 AM
The double push is as good as it gets, so I will just let you waste your time and energy on anything else you may imagine is better.

-Armadillo

As good as it gets?
Since when have you been able to double push, from the footage we have seen of you skating I find it hard to believe?
How much faster are you with your double push?

If you haven't tried the quadruple push how can you dismiss it so easy.............sureley Armadillo the great scientist would not dare dismiss something he hasn't tried.

"Condemnation without investigation is the height of ignorance"
-Albert Einstein

-Armadillo

cojaco61
February 25th, 2011, 11:05 PM
I would not recommend soccer cleats for any serious skating. They're great for tooling around at sessions and shuffle skating and stuff, but I would not suggest using them for serious speed or outdoor skating. They make good skate boots (I have a pair of adidas cleats on Marathons that I use for session), but they're not really countered good enough for serious skating IMO.

If you go back through the old skating pics. You will see plenty of top world class skaters on soccer boots (or cleats as you so annoyingly call them).

Guiseppi Cruciani, who was a multi world champion used Patrick Soccer Boots for years. So did so many others.

I would say 95% of people back when I was racing indoor and outdoor used them.

Dec8rSk8r
February 26th, 2011, 10:27 PM
Thanks Iggy!

Also, wanted to confirm that if my US shoe size is 7..will Riedell 195 size 7 be perfect for me or I need to take one size small/big in it...I mean how is the variation for this boot?

Thanks

Annie

You know that women normally go down one size right? I wear a 7.5 in normal ladies shoe, and the 6.5 fits me, your fit may be different of course. Here's a thread were it was discussed that might help you decide the right size for you - 195 fit (http://216.92.62.225/forums/showthread.php?t=33397) I figure when in doubt, it's better to get too small than too large, because you or a shoe cobbler can always stretch them a bit.

Armadillo
February 27th, 2011, 12:39 AM
As good as it gets?
Since when have you been able to double push, from the footage we have seen of you skating I find it hard to believe?
How much faster are you with your double push?

If you haven't tried the quadruple push how can you dismiss it so easy.............sureley Armadillo the great scientist would not dare dismiss something he hasn't tried.

I skate double push outdoors when crossovers are not advantageous.
The main benefit of the double push stroke is to set up the 2nd portion of it to allow the 2nd portion's push to start from a point as far to the inside as possible and thus allow a WIDER OUTWARD push for the 2nd half of the double push. The first half of the double push is much smaller of a push and does not generate nearly as much power as the 2nd half.

Just stringing a bunch of little weak wiggle strokes together, as in the the video of "quad push", is not really going to do much for you. Speed comes from WIDE PUSH strokes, not from small wiggle push strokes.

Perhaps you will eventually get it through your thick head at some point that the rink video of me skating tight all wheels down circles was to show what the skates could do for sharp turns, not how well or poorly I skate indoors.
Go strap on your Boens and then watch me skate skate circles around you indoors. That is what the video ws about.

-Armadillo

-

cass38a
February 27th, 2011, 01:25 AM
I have been asking you to post a video since the "how your stroke give you speed" thread so we can see this advanced stroke...............

Double push my arse, you are still learning how to skate and try to educate others on how to do it. Just because the theory works does not mean it translates to the real world, most people who double push drop it as soon as they start to sprint.

What ever you were trying to demonstrate in that indoor video escaped me, I can do that on my Ultimates with stock suspension:confused:

Armadillo
February 27th, 2011, 04:11 AM
I have been asking you to post a video since the "how your stroke give you speed" thread so we can see this advanced stroke...............

Double push my arse, you are still learning how to skate and try to educate others on how to do it. Just because the theory works does not mean it translates to the real world, most people who double push drop it as soon as they start to sprint.

What ever you were trying to demonstrate in that indoor video escaped me, I can do that on my Ultimates with stock suspension:confused:

I can skate well enough to do a flat course, low wind half marathon in near 60 minutes and WITHOUT DRAFTING on other skaters either.

I was demonstrating that just a cushion optimization can allow other skates which are NOT short forward DA-45 to still have sharp all-wheels-down turning capabilities despite their longer wheelbase. and without having to go up on their edges either.

BTW, the double push does do exactly what I was suggesting in the "How your stroke gives you speed" thread, as far as shifting your center of mass initially as far to the outside as possible, right before you then drive your main outward stroke push and lean sharply INWARD, moving your center of mass much closer to the center of the arc of the stroke. This mass shift inward is amplified by the double push, giving extra acceleration.
-Armadillo

cass38a
February 27th, 2011, 06:58 AM
How much of that half marathon did you double push for? Why no video?

Iggy
February 27th, 2011, 06:13 PM
If you go back through the old skating pics. You will see plenty of top world class skaters on soccer boots (or cleats as you so annoyingly call them).

Guiseppi Cruciani, who was a multi world champion used Patrick Soccer Boots for years. So did so many others.

I would say 95% of people back when I was racing indoor and outdoor used them.

Glad I could give you a chuckle :rolleyes:

Good for Guiseppi Cruciani. All I said was I wouldn't recommend soccer cleats (or boots as you so annoyingly call them) myself. I'm sure if Guiseppi Cruciani was on here and read the thread he may very well recommend them. But I'm not Guiseppi Cruciani. I'm a guy that has used soccer cleats indoor and outdoor and based on my experience I wouldn't recommend them for outdoor. No I'm not a world class speed skater, but I'm gonna take a wild guess that the OP isn't either (no offense intended).

I like my cleats quite well for skate boots. They're comfortable and nice and low cut. Perhaps they're are cleats that are better suited for speed skating than the ones I have. I would never tell anyone not to try something different. If someone wants to try them great. By all means go for it. If you and Guiseppi Cruciani like to speed skate on your cleats then please by all means have it.

cojaco61
February 27th, 2011, 09:36 PM
Glad I could give you a chuckle :rolleyes:

Good for Guiseppi Cruciani. All I said was I wouldn't recommend soccer cleats (or boots as you so annoyingly call them) myself. I'm sure if Guiseppi Cruciani was on here and read the thread he may very well recommend them. But I'm not Guiseppi Cruciani. I'm a guy that has used soccer cleats indoor and outdoor and based on my experience I wouldn't recommend them for outdoor. No I'm not a world class speed skater, but I'm gonna take a wild guess that the OP isn't either (no offense intended).

I like my cleats quite well for skate boots. They're comfortable and nice and low cut. Perhaps they're are cleats that are better suited for speed skating than the ones I have. I would never tell anyone not to try something different. If someone wants to try them great. By all means go for it. If you and Guiseppi Cruciani like to speed skate on your cleats then please by all means have it.

Funny you were pretty adamant that Soccer BOOTS, were not good for "any" serious speed skating. Or any serious skating for that matter

I would not recommend soccer cleats for any serious skating. They're great for tooling around at sessions and shuffle skating and stuff, but I would not suggest using them for serious speed or outdoor skating. They make good skate boots (I have a pair of adidas cleats on Marathons that I use for session), but they're not really countered good enough for serious skating IMO.

Just letting OP hear the other side of the story.:D:D:D

BananasRUS
March 7th, 2011, 10:19 PM
If you go back through the old skating pics. You will see plenty of top world class skaters on soccer boots (or cleats as you so annoyingly call them).

Guiseppi Cruciani, who was a multi world champion used Patrick Soccer Boots for years. So did so many others.

I would say 95% of people back when I was racing indoor and outdoor used them.

I have to strongly agree with you on the soccer boots. I just posted up my pics of my New Balance soccer shoe build that I skated on 25 miles yesterday for the American Diabetes Association annual Tour De Cure fund-raiser. They were perfectly comfortable, fast, and smooth the entire distance, so I can't brag about them enough! :biggrin:

Just my two cents worth of actual, long-distance, real-world experience.

BananasRUS
March 7th, 2011, 10:21 PM
I dare say that for distance, and even speed, a quality soccer shoe for outdoors is very hard to beat! I have also skated several other types of boots outdoors and for me, personally, New Balance is at the top of my list!

yedaki_de
March 8th, 2011, 08:39 PM
I dare say that for distance, and even speed, a quality soccer shoe for outdoors is very hard to beat! I have also skated several other types of boots outdoors and for me, personally, New Balance is at the top of my list!

Did you also try a Bont Quadracer? Thats my not to beat preference :smile:
The soccer boots are good for sure but the tight sole of the Bonts gives you an outstanding force-transfer.

BananasRUS
March 8th, 2011, 11:00 PM
Did you also try a Bont Quadracer? Thats my not to beat preference :smile:
The soccer boots are good for sure but the tight sole of the Bonts gives you an outstanding force-transfer.

I did try a Bont Quadracer once, but it did not fit me just right. I did not heat mold it because the insole was too small for me. I might try another one someday. I have a Bont Black Widow I might give a try for an outdoor build, too.