PDA

View Full Version : A little input on outdoor wheels, please?


CrimsonCrush
June 13th, 2011, 09:06 PM
I've been posting about outdoor wheels a lot lately, sorry about that. I'm just ridiculously broke but want to be able to go to outdoor practices.

My rink is offering an outdoor setup with bearings and Kryptonics Route 62 78a wheels for $79. It's not terribly expensive I know, but it's more than I can afford right now.

What I did find was these. I know that for this price they are going to be incredibly low quality, but will they at least get me through a summer of derby practices at a skate park, do you think?

http://www.backalleyskates.com/affordable-outdoor-wheel-and-bearing-combo.html

Also, should I pull my Gumballs off and put my stock toe stops back on? Will they get eaten up out there?

cass38a
June 13th, 2011, 10:32 PM
Only one way to find out, If they suck its only $20.

Armadillo
June 14th, 2011, 01:23 AM
As a rule of thumb, small hub wheels suck, and NO hub wheels REALLY SUCK.

-Armadillo

CrimsonCrush
June 14th, 2011, 01:25 AM
As a rule of thumb, small hub wheels suck, and NO hub wheels REALLY SUCK.

-Armadillo

I don't know what any of this means..... *embarassed*

Armadillo
June 14th, 2011, 01:59 AM
Wheels are mostly made of urethane synthetic rubber - it is the stuff that touches the ground/floor.

Cheap wheels are 100% urethane and it goes all the way from surrounding the bearings outward to the ground/floor.

Better wheels have strong hubs made of plastic or aluminum in the middle of the wheel, between the bearings and the urethane.
The bearings fit snugly into these hubs and are more precisely and rigidly located by the stronger (than urethane) materials of the hub.
The hubs continue outward from the bearings up to a maximum diameter of about 50mm before the urethane begins and continues all the way to the outer diameter limit of the wheel.
So, you have a layer of urethane surrounding a more rigid hub with the hub style wheels. It is like your car or bike having metal wheels and rubber wrapping around them.
Skate wheels can have hubs with urethane wrapped around them (or no hub at all).

A skate wheel with no hub is cheaper to make, and it typically performs at a low level. Wheels with small hubs usually perform better than no hub. Wheels with big hubs usually perform better than small hub wheels.

-Armadillo

Mom_2-3
June 14th, 2011, 06:27 AM
I bought a pair of these:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110662033177&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

I loved them enough to buy 2 more sets for my daughters. My sister then bought 2.
The wheels are nice and smooth and cut out the vibration that would other wise make your brain rattle. I skate mine whenever possible, have no signs of wear (except for a little staining where the wheel rubs the ground) and they don't seem too heavy compared to some of the other wheels I've been able to handle. My girls skated them to and from school everyday from April to the beginning of June, and laps around our complex with their friends after school. The wheels still look good, and don't appear to be "Crap".

I am planning to try other wheels from this seller in the near future, and to keep a couple pairs on hand for birthdays for our derby brats.


Cheap doesn't always mean crap. Try the cheap stuff, you may like it. :D

HK47
June 14th, 2011, 09:42 AM
As a rule of thumb, small hub wheels suck, and NO hub wheels REALLY SUCK.

-ArmadilloDepends what surface you wanna skate on and how fast - for a leisurely roll on rough asphalt then small hub wheels really take out the rumble nicely without any big drawbacks.

sommemi
June 14th, 2011, 02:45 PM
That's funny. I HAVE those wheels. :p And what dillo means by no hub is that they are ALL eurothane.... most wheels have that hard plastic or metal part in the middle (where the bearing goes) but these particular ones do not. They just have the space where the bearing goes (and the lip of eurothane as a spacer between the bearings) and that's that. I can take more pics for you if you want to see what they are like.

Honestly, if you really don't have the money, then these wheels aren't super bad. But they aren't nearly as nice as the Route 62s. But if you need an outdoor wheel, these will work. Keep in mind they are more the size of a dance wheel though, so they are not as wide/large as the Route 62s. When you finally upgrade to the Route 62s you might find it feels slightly different, but probably not different enough to really give you trouble.
Again, let me know if you want me to take some pics of my wheels tonight for you. It might help you make a decision. I mean, there's always the option of selling plasma/blood in order to pay for wheels, right? :p

(and I would think gumballs would be fine outside, just prepare for them to wear faster outside than inside.)

Armadillo
June 14th, 2011, 02:53 PM
Rules of thumb for outdoor wheels:

Size matters - 62mm is to small; 64-65mm is entry level size ; 70mm now you're talking. Small wheels get pinned up against surface imperfections and debris too easily - even soft ones. Translate=> Face Plants. Suggest you get ROUTE 65 and not Route 62

Soft is good (78a-85A), but High Rebound is better. The urethane formula makes a big difference. Impossible to know though until someone skates them. I don't even know what current best rebound outdoor wheel is?

-Armadillo

Fresh Eddie Fresh
June 14th, 2011, 02:58 PM
What type of surface is it? When you say skate park, I am thinking it is an outdoor rink of some sort? In all honesty, on tennis courts, outdoor rinks and whatnot that are flat, smooth concrete or asphalt, I find rock hard wheels that are terrible indoors work great. The surface is smooth, debris-free and grippy, so harder wheels do not really slide, and will wear better, and skate faster than wheels designed for bike paths.

For outdoor derby practice I have been using Hyperlicious and Rude Dudes. Neither gripped at all indoors, and would be terrible on the bike path or on the street but work perfect on the asphalt inline hockey rink we go to, the tennis courts by my house, and the concrete slab in the park. :)

ursle
June 14th, 2011, 03:12 PM
If you're speed skating outdoors use Inlines:wink:
But if you're outdoors tooling around having fun, depending on your plates action angle and axle location...
I find 5-10 degree plates like smaller wheels 54-62mm but D/A45's like larger wheels 62-70mm
Duro wise 78-82a is ideal for absorption of debris, high 80 to low 90a wheels are certainly going to work and grip well, to well, you can follow your tracks by the urethane trail:smile:

CrimsonCrush
June 15th, 2011, 08:30 PM
Wheels are mostly made of urethane synthetic rubber - it is the stuff that touches the ground/floor.

Cheap wheels are 100% urethane and it goes all the way from surrounding the bearings outward to the ground/floor.

Better wheels have strong hubs made of plastic or aluminum in the middle of the wheel, between the bearings and the urethane.
The bearings fit snugly into these hubs and are more precisely and rigidly located by the stronger (than urethane) materials of the hub.
The hubs continue outward from the bearings up to a maximum diameter of about 50mm before the urethane begins and continues all the way to the outer diameter limit of the wheel.
So, you have a layer of urethane surrounding a more rigid hub with the hub style wheels. It is like your car or bike having metal wheels and rubber wrapping around them.
Skate wheels can have hubs with urethane wrapped around them (or no hub at all).

A skate wheel with no hub is cheaper to make, and it typically performs at a low level. Wheels with small hubs usually perform better than no hub. Wheels with big hubs usually perform better than small hub wheels.

-Armadillo

Thanks SO much! Very helpful!!