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View Full Version : Can anything be done about rougher surfaces?


Surfinbernard
September 30th, 2011, 02:09 PM
I have searched through old threads and find that there are plenty of fave wheel threads but that most outdoors skaters seem to enjoy smoother surfaces to skate on and choose fast outdoor wheels accordingly. Unfortunately I am not so lucky and live in Birmingham UK. If you can find anywhere without chewed-up tarmac and potholes, or at least ones you can dodge, you're onto a winner. The tarmac is very bumpy, nobbly, boneshakingly rough almost everywhere and there are loose and uneven paving slabs on the footpaths -if you can find any that Merc drivers haven't parked all over. Also there are a lot of hills, a significantly scary one being my own street. Yes I'm nuts to want to skate here but it's that or just skate twice a week at derby practices.

So, is there anything I can do to make my experience more tolerable during the months it will take me to begin to conquer the huge challenges of outdoor skating in Balsall Heath? Would it make any difference to try different wheels? I have the cheap Krypto True wheels but was looking at Hyper Rollos, but if they will be the same then I won't bother. Any other tips? Thank you. :wink:

ursle
September 30th, 2011, 02:24 PM
I'd spend time on a road bike, safer (relatively), excellent exercise, will compliment your skating conditioning. Definitely an eye candy activity, just like skating.
Getting 70mm'ish kryptos will make the debris and bumps more durable but a bad skating surface is never going to improve and you're going to go to ground at speed which is rather Darwinian.

Kay
September 30th, 2011, 05:36 PM
I have Krypto Route 70's and I love them for rougher surfaces. I have to be super-vigilant and watch where I'm going, but I can skate pretty fast on sidewalks with them. I've used them on rough sidewalk and bricks without any trouble at all, and over weeds growing in cracked sidewalk. They still can't handle loose gravel, of course. You hit a pothole and you're on the ground. But that's why you wear safety gear!

But I can't say without looking if my "rough" is the same as yours.

I prefer skating to biking in nice weather because I can put my skates in my bag and take them in the office/restaurant/store without worrying about having to lock them up or whatever. But YMMV.

Surfinbernard
September 30th, 2011, 06:48 PM
Please forgive my ignorance, but could anyone use a 70mm wheel or does it depend if you have the clearance for it?

HK47
September 30th, 2011, 07:38 PM
70mm wheels fit on most skates ok, though with soft cushions you can get rubbing issues when leaning right over. Ditch the toe stops and fit a heel brake and you're set for serious terrain :D

Also, the thick insoles they sell for joggers really helps smooth out the ride ;)

Bondagekitten
September 30th, 2011, 08:17 PM
Glasgow has similar problems but there is a good cycle track in Bellahouston park which some of the skaters I know use (I live miles away and haven't tried it yet). Might be worth checking the council website to see if there is anything like that near you. The girls I know use kryptonics so you should be fine if you find somewhere suitable.

Another suggestion I got told was look for concrete basketball courts for stuff that doesn't need much space to work on like topstop runs and just basic skating

HK47
September 30th, 2011, 08:36 PM
One of the guys from the Men's League here found a new-ish business estate thats hardly used; it has a bunch of smooth small carparks, connected with smooth-ish asphalt and I LOVE skating there.

On smoother surfaces I'm really enjoying running 62mm outdoor wheels, the bigger ones really are only good for the rough stuff.

Reserector
September 30th, 2011, 10:18 PM
Go BIG! Scooter or inline wheels FTW!
I don't know if quadlines are available in your area, but I rigged these myself.
Here is the build link: http://southernskater.com/Thread-Redneck-Quadline-Project?highlight=quadline

How they look now:

http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd110/Reserector_/Phone%20Pics/9403fa0a-1.jpg

http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd110/Reserector_/Phone%20Pics/89b13159.jpg

Surfinbernard
September 30th, 2011, 11:05 PM
Brilliant Reserector! Love those skates, do they just roll over the rough ground with no trouble? I even tried inlines but I didn't like them and they seemed only marginally better on the rough, but those look awesome.

Nellie
October 2nd, 2011, 10:39 PM
I have the cheap Krypto True wheels but was looking at Hyper Rollos, but if they will be the same then I won't bother. Any other tips? Thank you. :wink:
This summer I brought my skates to the UK for the first time and I must say you guys definitely have the roughest asphalt I've ever skated on for any length of time. While I really enjoyed the street skate I joined in London - good music, great people, nice and competent marshals - I kept wondering why people do it in a country where the pavements are generally better than the roads. So, what can you do apart from finding other skating spots ??
Krypto Trues are actually pretty good wheels for your purpose in my opinion, and I've tried a lot of outdoor wheels. They feel better - more comfy - and seem faster to me than my Sure-Grip Motions (also 65mm), so I'm not sure Hyper Rollos would be any better.
I agree that good cushiony insoles will help (with my thin Bont ones I found even our comparatively super-smooth streets pretty unbearable, so good insoles do make a big difference).
A forward mount also helps in getting over pebbles/debris/cracks, if you are willing to build a second pair of skates for outdoor skating.
This (http://www.londonskaters.com/how-to-skate-on-rough-ground.htm)is mostly for inline skaters, but most of it makes a lot of sense for quads, too. Apart from that . . . try to just ignore the chattering of your teeth and skate on, pushing as strongly and confidently as you can - that's what I did and it worked :wink:.

Surfinbernard
October 3rd, 2011, 11:05 PM
This summer I brought my skates to the UK for the first time and I must say you guys definitely have the roughest asphalt I've ever skated on for any length of time. While I really enjoyed the street skate I joined in London - good music, great people, nice and competent marshals - I kept wondering why people do it in a country where the pavements are generally better than the roads. So, what can you do apart from finding other skating spots ??
Krypto Trues are actually pretty good wheels for your purpose in my opinion, and I've tried a lot of outdoor wheels. They feel better - more comfy - and seem faster to me than my Sure-Grip Motions (also 65mm), so I'm not sure Hyper Rollos would be any better.
I agree that good cushiony insoles will help (with my thin Bont ones I found even our comparatively super-smooth streets pretty unbearable, so good insoles do make a big difference).
A forward mount also helps in getting over pebbles/debris/cracks, if you are willing to build a second pair of skates for outdoor skating.
This (http://www.londonskaters.com/how-to-skate-on-rough-ground.htm)is mostly for inline skaters, but most of it makes a lot of sense for quads, too. Apart from that . . . try to just ignore the chattering of your teeth and skate on, pushing as strongly and confidently as you can - that's what I did and it worked :wink:.

Great post, thanks! I will try the insoles, I already have s/f mounted skates so hopefully that will improve things, I just got them. That's good news about the wheels, I can save a few quid there. The link has some excellent advice, thanks :smile: I actually feel like skating outdoors again now, I haven't been in a while. I will start with the park where there is some acceptable tarmac and build myself up to the really bumpy stuff gradually I reckon.

Armadillo
October 4th, 2011, 05:10 AM
http://i489.photobucket.com/albums/rr259/RRLedford/ConverseLeather/IMG_4053.jpg
http://i489.photobucket.com/albums/rr259/RRLedford/ConverseLeather/IMG_4050.jpg
The 8.5" wheelbase of this size 13 Converse leather shoe build with carbon fiber stiffener sheet on sole makes the 70mm Twister wheels look small, but the Kryptonics Classic 76mm wheels with decent size hub look just right for smooth rolling on rougher asphalt.

-Armadillo

Rollerelle
October 16th, 2011, 09:01 PM
So, is there anything I can do to make my experience more tolerable during the months it will take me to begin to conquer the huge challenges of outdoor skating in Balsall Heath? Would it make any difference to try different wheels? I have the cheap Krypto True wheels but was looking at Hyper Rollos, but if they will be the same then I won't bother. Any other tips? Thank you. :wink:

So pleased you asked this! I've struggled all summer to find somewhere smoother to skate & still not quite found the perfect place. I live in the Midlands also and it's hilly near me. There are a few parks with a tiny strip of tarmac which are great for practicing tricks but I want to go for a good skate!

Have found a promising spot, but it has some rough patches, so hoping a new set of wheels will make for a smoother ride. I will say that insoles have made a massive difference to my skating, so definitely invest in some. Good luck with your skating!

Stormi
October 22nd, 2011, 12:27 AM
I don't think any wheel would completely absorb the bumps and vibrations. I skate route 65s around the bike track around the lake, which has a variety of surfaces from pavers to asphalt to standard cement to this nice smooth orange cement stuff to this rough pebbly type pathing (and quite often patches of sand lol). Even on inlines, which i used to skate before quads, you feel the vibrations and roughness. Just found it easier to dodge debris on inlines. Definitely a rear brake if there a big hills. I still haven't really used mine except when I was first testing it on a small hill, but it's nice to know I have it in an emergency.

Gero
October 23rd, 2011, 06:40 PM
I don't think any wheel would completely absorb the bumps and vibrations. I skate route 65s around the bike track around the lake, which has a variety of surfaces from pavers to asphalt to standard cement to this nice smooth orange cement stuff to this rough pebbly type pathing (and quite often patches of sand lol). Even on inlines, which i used to skate before quads, you feel the vibrations and roughness. Just found it easier to dodge debris on inlines. Definitely a rear brake if there a big hills. I still haven't really used mine except when I was first testing it on a small hill, but it's nice to know I have it in an emergency.

Kryptonics Route 70 is the best soft wheels which absorbs the most from poor roads. Not the fastest but the smoothest solution for recreational outdoorskating to skate against bumps and debris.

Armadillo
October 25th, 2011, 02:01 AM
Kryptonics Route 70 is the best soft wheels which absorbs the most from poor roads. Not the fastest but the smoothest solution for recreational outdoorskating to skate against bumps and debris.

Gero, have you rolled on the Kryptonic classic 76mm wheels pictured above?
If your plates can handle the 76mm size, you might be surprised at how much better they handle the rough asphalt (and concerte grooves) than even the 70mm Kryptos do.

The Rannalli Rocket SA plates really allow for some seriously big wheels.
They may not be Boens, but they do have a few advantages anyway.

-Armadillo

Reserector
October 25th, 2011, 05:19 AM
Brilliant Reserector! Love those skates, do they just roll over the rough ground with no trouble? I even tried inlines but I didn't like them and they seemed only marginally better on the rough, but those look awesome.

You can still feel the vibration from the rough surface, but the 98mm diameter of these narrow scooter wheels help them roll over debris and cracks better than anything else I have tried.

Gero
October 25th, 2011, 08:22 AM
Gero, have you rolled on the Kryptonic classic 76mm wheels pictured above?
If your plates can handle the 76mm size, you might be surprised at how much better they handle the rough asphalt (and concerte grooves) than even the 70mm Kryptos do.

-Armadillo


Nope, because I have no real problem with too rough asphalt here in Germany. :smile:

78a or 80a wheels are also no alternative for me with my weight of around 93kg (which is around 200lbs), they are much too slow for me and not usable on longer distances.

I skate outdoors distances between 25-135 km a day, this only possible for me with wheels around 84a durometer hardness.

This year I used the 76mm 84a Landyachtz Zombie Hawks for recreational training or the70mm 84a RD Twister (aka Velocity Race) in competitions like marathon races.

The Zombies feel a bit smoother but the Twister (also with 6mm less diameter) are definitely faster and about half the weight of the Zombies.

Cheers

Gero

Armadillo
October 26th, 2011, 05:19 AM
Nope, because I have no real problem with too rough asphalt here in Germany. :smile:

78a or 80a wheels are also no alternative for me with my weight of around 93kg (which is around 200lbs), they are much too slow for me and not usable on longer distances.

I skate outdoors distances between 25-135 km a day, this only possible for me with wheels around 84a durometer hardness.

This year I used the 76mm 84a Landyachtz Zombie Hawks for recreational training or the70mm 84a RD Twister (aka Velocity Race) in competitions like marathon races.

The Zombies feel a bit smoother but the Twister (also with 6mm less diameter) are definitely faster and about half the weight of the Zombies.

Cheers

Gero

Makes perfect sense if the asphalt is smooth.
Gotta luv those lightweight Twisters for racing. don't you?!


-Armadillo

Gero
October 26th, 2011, 08:12 AM
Makes perfect sense if the asphalt is smooth.
Gotta luv those lightweight Twisters for racing. don't you?!


-Armadillo

Sure, I am happy and proud to have some sets of them and enjoy them really,(unfortunatly) there is no real alternative to them on the market.