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sk8scott
October 7th, 2006, 11:59 PM
Back on the old forum, there was a thread about how inline skating's popularity was rapidly dropping, at least here in the USA. Once again, last night I heard that tired "joke" that pretty much says it all in a nutshell:

Q: "What's the hardest thing about rollerblading?"
A: "Telling your parents that you're gay."

This came not from some illiterate redneck or punk kid, but from a doctor - a liberal one, who told this joke with his hippie wife at his side. It was pretty funny seeing their reaction when I mentioned that being straight hasn't kept me from doing a lot of skating myself. (Not that there's anything wrong with other orientations in my book, but in the real world there's stigma associated with such things and I like to keep people's facts...well, straight!)

Like it or not, the mainstream young American male is homophobic and equates male inline skating with male homosexuality. This intimidates them and others out of trying the sport, if their laziness hasn't already deterred them. Feats of speed, endurance, and/or grace aren't "manly" in the USA if lycra is involved. Likewise, the mainstream girls and young women who used to skate to see and be seen are now hanging out at motocross rallies. It doesn't matter if you and your half-dozen skating friends see things differently. We don't count.

Most of us here are either old enough to have outgrown such insecurities, or just don't care what the mainstream folks think of our favorite mode of exercise. Still, we have to understand that we're *different*, and if we see popularity questions through our own eyes instead of those of the mainstream we might as well be blind! If we want more people skating, we can't try to get them to like what we do. We have to make what we do be more like what they like, or at least it has to look that way.

----Scott

Ice Ramps
October 8th, 2006, 02:23 AM
I faced a lot of the same judgments as I grew up figure skating in Birmingham, Alabama (Mom was a coach) and I am not Gay either, it is a misjudged stereotype, I am old enough now to just plain not care what anyone thinks. Kinda hard to acuse a married (with kids) airborne Infantry guy that has been to combat twice of being Gay. Besides who really cares anyway.

Dale

online inline
October 8th, 2006, 05:48 AM
sk8skcott, i have never heard that stereotype, and i really doubt that it is as widespread as you say. I live in an area that is crowded with men and women riding everywhere in lycra on racing bikes. The same lycra we wear on the same trails, etc. etc. If we're gay, then their gay, and and if their are that many gays running around, it;s a damn wonder theirs any babies in this world.

As for me, I always figure my time is too valuable to spend trying to fathom the way an idiot thinks, so i don't. I'm not looking for anyone's approval when i do what i do, especially not that of the brain dead constituency you are refering to.

ANd i think you are dead wrong on saying:

"...like it or not, the mainstream young American male is homophobic and equates male inline skating with male homosexuality. This intimidates them and others out of trying the sport, if their laziness hasn't already deterred them. Feats of speed, endurance, and/or grace aren't "manly" in the USA if lycra is involved."

The only skaters wearing spandex are speed skaters, and just about nobody knows that speed skaters wear spandex until you;'ve skated for a long time and somehow stumble into one of their practices. I skated for a year before i even knew their was something called speed skating, and only when i went to my first group skate did see that it involved spandex. So, in conclusion, if their is something keeping kids from taking up inline skating, it is not the image of a skinsuited speed skater, becuase they don't even know that there is such a thing.

What kids know is the image of gnarly skateboarders and rebel aggressive street skaters and skatepark tricksters. these are cool dudes, and i don't think they are seen as effeminate (sp?). IF kids want to inline skate and be tough, they have the accepted gear and image out there to rely upon.

every time i visit Vancouver, i am amazed at the thousand of inliners i see out on the streets and parks, tearing up the asphalt, rather wildly i may add. They really look like ex-hockey players taking it to the streets. Their's nothing gay about it, to use your termanology. They look totally bonzo.

Sorry, dude, just don't see it. Isn't their more pressing things to worry about?

rokdaddy
October 8th, 2006, 06:22 AM
Like it or not, the mainstream young American male is homophobic and equates male inline skating with male homosexuality. This intimidates them and others out of trying the sport, if their laziness hasn't already deterred them. Feats of speed, endurance, and/or grace aren't "manly" in the USA if lycra is involved... It doesn't matter if you and your half-dozen skating friends see things differently. We don't count
I think that you nailed the primary reason for the decline of inline skating in the US. It's a weak perception, but it does exist. I hear similar skating jokes regularly at work and I work in an enviroment that has about five thousand highly educated "nerds" within less than a square mile of property.

It's natural for us to want to come up with reasons why we are not "gay" just because we skate. But none of those reasons provide any explanation as to why the popularity of the sport is diminishing.

Jibberish18
October 8th, 2006, 07:44 AM
Honestly none of what you just said sounds right to me. It doesn't now and it didn't 10 years ago as a kid. When I was a kid, inline skating was very weird to me because I just never saw myself doing it, it use to amaze me when I actually did see someone on a pair. I was a cyclist myself and played mainly basketball. But I never did think too myself "Hey that guy on rollerblades sure looks pretty gay riding those things...I'm gonna go ride my mountain bike to brush the nasty off of my eyes!"

I personally think that inline skating is not as popular as something as a bike because many children learn how to ride a bike because their parents are not only more familiar with bicycles but they also probably know ONLY to ride a bike. I'll bet many parents NEVER think of putting their kids on any type of skate. Reason? It's unfamiliar, seems dangerous and isn't very popular. To me at least.

I faced a lot of the same judgments as I grew up figure skating in Birmingham, Alabama

I will admit that the first time I saw a young male figure skating was when I was 15. He was a bit chubby, graceful and doing 360's and landing on one skate while moving his hands like a ballerina. Even though I was always mature for my age, I did think he did look a bit gay. But in reality the kid really did look gay it was just very stupid of me to think of something so stupid in the first place. I'm glad I've dropped such stupid thoughts completely since then. Besides, while he was skating like a pro, I fell HARD on my ass twice trying to skate and embarassed myself many times in front of other childish teenagers sooooo.......

sk8scott
October 8th, 2006, 02:32 PM
Sorry, dude, just don't see it. Isn't their more pressing things to worry about?

OI, I agree with many of your points, especially the quoted one. I was just venting about that obnoxious joke, which I've heard far too many times. I don't think it's far-fetched to say that the joke is a symptom of why it's hard to find a good skate shop in most US locales, or why you don't see many male inliners under 30 who aren't either speed skaters or aggressive tricksters.

Also, I'd like to point out that all the "doesn't seem right to me" posts are completely missing the point. It's not about how it seems to us, because unless we see things through the eyes of non-skaters, we're utterly clueless. That's not an opinion, but a fact.

Right now, the more pressing thing to worry about is that it's a nice day and I need to figure out where I'm going to skate!

----Scott

online inline
October 8th, 2006, 03:10 PM
Scott, point well taken. The subjsct gets me irritated and that;s not your fault. ANd apparantely others hear it as well, so i'm reading the situation wrong, as it may seem.

I'd like to talk more but me and the other homosexuals are checking out a new area for a possible criterium race.

Later.

Kathie Fry
October 8th, 2006, 03:28 PM
I don't agree that the general public equates inline skating with being gay, at least not because inline skaters wear lycra. I have seen thousands of skaters on the Venice Beach bike path over the years, and almost none of them were wearing lycra. Most of our local skaters wear hip-hop clothes, yuppie clothes, or (most often) regular jeans and a t-shirt. A speed skater is a pretty rare sight.

- Kathie

PS:
People do often wonder if male ice and roller figure skaters are gay, and I can tell you for sure that some are gay and some are not.

Pepper Montana
October 8th, 2006, 06:39 PM
sk8skcott, i have never heard that stereotype, and i really doubt that it is as widespread as you say.

Online, I don't know if your living on the Coast is a factor or not. It is my impression that towards the center of the country the people are more conservative and reactionary towards some issues. My wife has relatives that live in "Dry Towns," for example. (Think of that movie with Kevin Bacon and the Penn that died, Footloose.) People aren't as accepting towards shakin' your bacon in the lycra in some regions. I'm not being judgemental, just sayin' how some people are.

online inline
October 8th, 2006, 06:50 PM
Yeah, i guess i know, that sterotype exists. But as i said before and has Kathie said as well, most people don't equate skating with spandex/lycra.

I'm sure coastal thought is more tolerant. That's one of the biggest reasons i moved here.

But if there's one thing i can't tolerate, it's intolerant people. I'm just funny that way.

jlerp
October 8th, 2006, 06:55 PM
I've never thought of inline skating as having "gay" associations at all.:confused:

IMO, the biggest challenge the sport faces is it looks much harder and more dangerous than it is. That keeps beginners from picking up the sport and parents from encouraging it.

Also, there's the trail factor. Inline fitness skating needs decent trails. Joggers can deal with shorter trails and worse terrain than skaters. Cyclists can use the street. If there aren't good trails around, there won't be skaters.

Pepper Montana
October 8th, 2006, 07:27 PM
But if there's one thing i can't tolerate, it's intolerant people. I'm just funny that way.

Exactly right! Intolerance will not be tolerated.

motosk8ter
October 8th, 2006, 07:41 PM
This is one of those topics I never gave much thought about. The "fruitboots" thing I always took as we are "boarders" or "aggressives" and you inliners are wimps because you do not do what we do. I know I could never do a half pipe 360 nor do I want to do that...well maybe a little. Look at our culture! 25 years ago the inline was the coolest thing in town. It now is viewed from eyes that see murders on television, in their videogames and at the movies. Extreme sports rule and the average kid who wants to do something that is not extreme, such as inline skate, is seen as a wimp. I would be discouraged, if I was trying to find myself as a young person, to engage in any sport. Working in a school I had to stop a head butting of a dumpster, by a senior no less, as it was being photgraphed for a class and was considered great sport. Inline skating cannot hold a candle to hood surfing at 50mph or more. The "culture of cool" rules in all sports. We have lost our "cool". Now if a video was made such as "Grand Theft Skater" you might begin to see a resurgence. Roller Derby has reached a mass market more than any other roller sport of late. Unfortunately it is on quads and there is a sense of tough female gayness to it. I still feel it is not about sexual orientation as much as we have lost our "cool":cool:

My wife and I, (Note wife), went to a Gay Union yesterday, (Marriage), and I did not see anyone on inlines or quads;) . It was just sensitive and different!

Phil

sk8scott
October 8th, 2006, 08:20 PM
Yep, Motosk8ter, the "cool" factor definitely disappeared long ago, right around the time motor sports took over ESPN's "X-Games" back in '99 or so.

No skates at the union ceremony??? You've got to be kidding! (LOL)

Another factor that might drive the orientation comments is the fear factor. Most guys in their teens/20s can't handle being scared to do something, especially an activity that they've seen moms do with strollers! So, they defend themselves with stereotypes and insults to suggest that the activity is too effeminate for them, instead of admitting that they're chicken. Sad...

On a less contentious note, I picked the lakefront bike path for my skate today. It was a good choice - not too crowded, and an amazing view of the fall foliage on the Adirondacks across the lake. I was going to comment on how few other skaters I saw, but there were at least 7 (8 if you count the guy on rollerskis) Still way outnumbered by cyclists, alas...

----Scott

maherwoman
October 8th, 2006, 09:11 PM
I have to say that I've never in my life thought a man wearing inlines (no matter what else he was wearing) was gay. My main thought, as a woman, is "wow, he's in really great shape!" There are many things a man can wear, whether it has lycra involved or not, that make him more manly. And, to be honest, I think the people that sit there and are so ready to call someone "gay" for doing ANYTHING, are most likely jealous that you are able to do something they are not.

I equate it quite a bit to what I posted recently about a wife of a friend (I don't consider her herself a friend of mine) making the comment that quad skating is "vintage" and not something peope really do anymore. She doesn't do it, she has no abilities in the subject, so she has to cut it down to make herself feel better.

That's really the bottom line. They see someone in-shape, and are jealous of their abilities...so they must cut the person down.

I really don't see one sport as better than another, or one ability as better than another. We all have our special abilities, and things we like to do. We're all different...and that's what makes life beautiful. :)

P.S. I think it's a smart man that keeps himself in shape...and I find it a very attractive quality. My husband skates inlines, and though he isn't on the level of speed or endurance skating, he certainly looks good out there in the rink in his hockey inlines! :D

motosk8ter
October 8th, 2006, 10:42 PM
sk8scott: admitting that they're chicken.

Dude this feather theme is going too far:D

I agree with you completely except for the chicken part. Maybe dog, cat, horse (horses are big wimps):D

Phil

Spins
October 9th, 2006, 07:42 AM
"Back on the old forum, there was a thread about how inline skating's popularity was rapidly dropping, at least here in the USA. Once again, last night I heard that tired "joke" that pretty much says it all in a nutshell: Q: 'What's the hardest thing about rollerblading?' A: 'Telling your parents that you're gay.'"

Sk8scott, perhaps this might be a local joke but I bought my 9- and 6-year-old a pair of rollerblades only two months ago with lightup wheels. Certainly if the national trend were so then retail markets would not be so well stocked in rollerblade varieties. The public at large seems to steer clear of defined counter-culture and controversial issues.

"This came not from some illiterate redneck or punk kid, but from a doctor - a liberal one, who told this joke with his hippie wife at his side."

That is the trouble with local humor. It is always subject to misinterpretation. For example it was well accepted for years that jokes about Alabama were just light humor and the more primitive citizens of that state were from "L.A." No slam on California but the "L." simply referred to the lower portion of our neighboring state (ha, ha). We love Alabamians but through the years of economic competition Georgia won out.

"It was pretty funny seeing their reaction when I mentioned that being straight hasn't kept me from doing a lot of skating myself. (Not that there's anything wrong with other orientations in my book, but in the real world there's stigma associated with such things and I like to keep people's facts...well, straight!)"

You really are taking this issue to heart! For example, virtues of "Diversity" has been aimed at this country for over 40 years while the ultimate diversity is the mixed family. Those remain low in number and an unusual sight here in Dixie. Should we exclaim that diversity has not worked because of such low numbers yet there is nothing wrong with other "orientations" (to exclude homogenious marriages) as the source of all diversity troubles? Outrageous speculations!

"Like it or not, the mainstream young American male is homophobic and equates male inline skating with male homosexuality."

Who can figure all of this meaning except what you believe it to be more true to locals than where we all live? Might I be elder-phobic by equating a very good conditioned antique car with its little old lady from Pasadena? Who shall be afraid of an old woman because some drive old cars and a few shouldn't be allowed to travel that way? Makes little sense to me.

"This intimidates them and others out of trying the sport, if their laziness hasn't already deterred them. Feats of speed, endurance, and/or grace aren't "manly" in the USA if lycra is involved. Likewise, the mainstream girls and young women who used to skate to see and be seen are now hanging out at motocross rallies. It doesn't matter if you and your half-dozen skating friends see things differently. We don't count."

What is "lycra"? Obviously we run in different circles unless I'm in need of my dictionary. I'd hardly compare inline skating wheels with the thunder and excitement of motorbikes. These are separate leagues. I'd go with the bikes and all the noise myself.

[Having read more posts I've learned what lycra-wear is or remember a reference to it. Funny, in a forum that I run someone came to it with the idea of lycra being a homosexual practice. I did not understand what they meant at the time but if it is that tight-fitting nylon then I've worn it myself to compete.]

"Most of us here are either old enough to have outgrown such insecurities, or just don't care what the mainstream folks think of our favorite mode of exercise."

This does sound like good advice but it is the mainstream media that strides to set all conditions of our existance. We may have to accept the rise and decline of skating as the public rekindles from time to time that 140-year love. You just can't let it have such an effect on everyday living.

"Still, we have to understand that we're *different*, and if we see popularity questions through our own eyes instead of those of the mainstream we might as well be blind! If we want more people skating, we can't try to get them to like what we do. We have to make what we do be more like what they like, or at least it has to look that way."

I think you had it together all along.

Gary
o-o

********************************888

Spins
October 9th, 2006, 08:08 AM
"I have to say that I've never in my life thought a man wearing inlines (no matter what else he was wearing) was gay."

I hope not. Funny story is that I use to like a girl in highschool by the Name of Kathy Gay. She kept telling me that she had an Uncle by the name of Ben (ha, ha). Also, I live not too far from Gay, Georgia and they never agreed to be but happy:rolleyes: (ha, ha).

Oh my, what am I doing up so late?

Gary
o-o

***********************************888

Jointlock
October 9th, 2006, 01:39 PM
I never see spandex either. Even though I am 41 when I skate its in jeans/cargo's and either a tank top (with all my tats showing) or a hoodie. Skaters look just like skateboarders or aggro skaters. Here in NYC skating is strong, and freestyle is growing. Everytime my cones go down, people watch, ask questions and many want to try it. Many of the kids who skate love the aggro, or play roller hockey (hockey players learn slalom fast- they usually have great strenght and all the drills/skating give them a really strong base to work with). I think in my area its the lack of hockey facilities, skate parks and public parks that are good for skating that keep interest from growing.
We need places to go to skate, but there are not that many decent places in such a large city. My girlfriend lives in Westchester, and there isn't 1 good skating spot in the county.

Spins
October 9th, 2006, 03:28 PM
Online Inline: "But if there's one thing i can't tolerate, it's intolerant people. I'm just funny that way."

There is a common misconception that tolerance means acceptance. I have tolerated skaters crossing the center within a foot of my spinning but never accepted such.

From time to time I approach a center-rink crosser and ask they not skate so close to possible danger should I fall out of the spin with a wild foot:eek: :eek:.

Gary
o-o

**********************************888

online inline
October 9th, 2006, 03:51 PM
Like it or not, the mainstream young American male is homophobic and equates male inline skating with male homosexuality. This intimidates them and others out of trying the sport, if their laziness hasn't already deterred them. Feats of speed, endurance, and/or grace aren't "manly" in the USA if lycra is involved. Likewise, the mainstream girls and young women who used to skate to see and be seen are now hanging out at motocross rallies.

This whole thing is preposterous, even taken at face value. If one wanted to dissect this ridiculous view, which i was trying not to reduce myself to.... one would soon realize that the very common decor of the prowling gay person is not lycra, not spandex, not skating gear. The look i see going in to and out of gay clubs in my city is black leather with boots and maybe a few chains thrown in. Kind of like a motocross rallies. Gee, the gay association sure didn't seem to hurt that sport (see your quotation above).

As John Prine said in his very funny and insightful Song "Dear Abby": "...so quit wishin' for bad luck and knockin' on wood."

motosk8ter
October 9th, 2006, 07:11 PM
The look i see going in to and out of gay clubs in my city is black leather with boots and maybe a few chains thrown in. Kind of like a motocross rallies. Gee, the gay association sure didn't seem to hurt that sport (see your quotation above).

As John Prine said in his very funny and insightful Song "Dear Abby": "...so quit wishin' for bad luck and knockin' on wood."[/QUOTE]

O/I...Whoa big boy! You have been watching too many "Police Academy" movies:D . The bottom line on this is we have lost our "cool". It is no longer cool to skate. I agree that it is preposterous to even have this thread as the discussion is moot regarding gayness and skating. Motorcycles will always be cool and the equipment we wear, as with skating, is necessary. In the previous Forum I mentioned perceptions of masculine pursuits. Parachuting, mountain biking, motorcycling, things like this rated high in the male gender identification. Skating does not unless of course you are a skater. I have always seen it as neutral, although more women do it. If an individual plays for the other team (Gay Side) so be it. I appreciate a good skater. Same with bikes. Lets not expand this into something it is not. Simply put, Skating has lost its cool. We will get it back just as much as Harley Davidson Stocks demonstrate the ultimate in getting "cool" back. Skating is a cool thing just by its nature and inlines are awesome, there is no denying that. It will come back along with the bell bottoms!

Phil

Clemens
October 9th, 2006, 07:58 PM
I never ever have heard of such a silly reasoning why inline skating is not as popular as it might have been and as it could be.
There might be several reasons why inline is not the big thing like other sports, but I definitely exclude something like gayaffinity.
Partly it's a hen and egg problem: Inline is not Olympic, so no or little money is invested. Without investment into locations, work with young skaters etc. inline skating will take more time to become Olympic.
But I am convinced it will make its way there. Let's be patient and persistent, but not care about sexual orientation.

Code Monkey
October 10th, 2006, 04:21 PM
Ok, Ok! I get the hint, I'll stop wearing my Tutu when I go skate. But I'm wearing it deer hunting and that's all I'm going to say!!!!

Pepper Montana
October 10th, 2006, 04:26 PM
Is it a blaze orange tutu? Normally I wouldn't say this, but I think that I would enjoy seeing that.

skaterdog
October 10th, 2006, 04:42 PM
Ok, Ok! I get the hint, I'll stop wearing my Tutu when I go skate. But I'm wearing it deer hunting and that's all I'm going to say!!!!


Code Monkey...I'm with you on the Tutu. Personally I find them very comfortable to skate in but I think some people just don't like men in Tutus....

Remember the backlash this photo created...



http://www.bartcop.com/kerry-tutu.jpg

Code Monkey
October 10th, 2006, 06:54 PM
I liked the pink but I got one like George Steinbrenners that he wore at his recital yesterday which is more of a mauve.

speedysktr
October 10th, 2006, 10:39 PM
While I agree that there is a decent amount of homophobia in this country, I reject outright that there is any connection between homophobia and the decline of skating. Online how are you seeing enough of these "gay clubs" to make that kind of statement? :eek: ;) :p

It is a testimoney to our collective ignorance about the gay community that these stereotypes are even being discussed. Get real, fellas. Who gives a rats ass anyway? bikers? motocross rallies? leather...pfft!!!

Inline skating declined because it was a fad for a lot of it's participants. As someone who has been on inlines since '92 I can tell you in no uncertain terms that it is back on the upswing. Just because the markets are changing means nothing. Inline was at it's peak well before any one even thought of it going into the olympics. Next subject.

sk8scott
October 10th, 2006, 11:52 PM
OnlineInline, while I disagree that it's absurd to think that "gay" stereotypes have had a role in inline's decline, I think you're dead-on about the sport having been a fad for many participants. For my generation, it was mainly something that people tried out in high school, college, or young adulthood and then left it behind after a while.

I definitely want to make it clear that I don't agree with any of the stereotypes I'm describing, and I surely don't think they're logically derived. I can't think of any gay folks I've known who were inliners, nor who wore lycra. (nor motorcycle leather, for that matter, except for one guy in college who actually rode a motorcycle)

I agree that this thread has probably run its course, and I got my chance to vent about that obnoxious joke!

----Scott

online inline
October 11th, 2006, 12:12 AM
scott, if gays would take up the sport, maybe we wouldn't have event after event being cancelled. You got the whole thing all backawards. We want gays in the sport. I can beat them as easy as anyone else, and atleast then, i'd have an event to beat them at.

speedysktr
October 11th, 2006, 02:12 AM
We want gays in the sport.Um, I think it's pretty much just you there buddy, whadya gotta mouse in your pocket?
I can beat them as easy as anyone else, can you? can you really? at least then, i'd have an event to beat them at. I'm sure that would be a big relief to finally find something you can do better than gays.

okay, I'm done. I'm sure there's a man law that covers this. OI, nothing personal, buddy, just doing my job. Peace out.

Code Monkey
October 11th, 2006, 02:16 AM
I also want to point out in all seriousness, that John Kerry's dress is highly inappropriate for skating, he should be wearing a helmet and elbow pads like I do.

speedysktr
October 11th, 2006, 02:27 AM
I heard he wasnt wearing any underwear in that picture. That can't be good.

motosk8ter
October 11th, 2006, 03:11 AM
This thread has really decompensated. I am having visions of leather clad men, with a pink tutu, inline skating on the trail. Let me just say this and then I can sign off on the thread for good. Gay men, Gay women, Straight men, Straight women, real men and real women you are all welcome. Put on your skates and lets rock:D ! We are here not for gender, although Rosie's legs are still being awaited, but for the skate. Lets put this beast to rest and move on to more productive topics such as making "senior" or something.

online inline
October 11th, 2006, 04:49 AM
This thread has really decompensated. I am having visions of leather clad men, with a pink tutu, inline skating on the trail. Let me just say this and then I can sign off on the thread for good. Gay men, Gay women, Straight men, Straight women, real men and real women you are all welcome. Put on your skates and lets rock:D ! We are here not for gender, although Rosie's legs are still being awaited, but for the skate. Lets put this beast to rest and move on to more productive topics such as making "senior" or something.

I'll second that, all in favor say "I"....so approved.

masters_sk8tr
October 11th, 2006, 03:03 PM
Hmmm...been in speed for a long, long time, more years than many of you are old, and I've never been questioned about my orientation. Not that there's anything wrong with that!;) I don't care who's standing on the line with me and long as they're male, and don't mind staring at my backside, 'cause that's all they're going to see when the gun goes off. Also, I think the ladies enjoy the spandex look. I've certainly seen them glance and smile. Fine with me! :o

unalaska
October 11th, 2006, 03:32 PM
My what a thread, here are a few questions I have always wondered about.

You are in a pace line, wearing spandex of course, where is the appropriate hand placement for the person behind you?
Would it be different based on sexual orientation or gender?
Does the color of the spandex you wear make a difference?
Is their a seasonal or event appropriate color?

I thought just trying to skate better was enough, now I have to worry about all this stuff, I'm just saying.

mvirtue
October 11th, 2006, 04:11 PM
My what a thread, here are a few questions I have always wondered about.

You are in a pace line, wearing spandex of course, where is the appropriate hand placement for the person behind you?
Would it be different based on sexual orientation or gender?
Does the color of the spandex you wear make a difference?
Is their a seasonal or event appropriate color?

I thought just trying to skate better was enough, now I have to worry about all this stuff, I'm just saying.

1) Small of the back
2) no difference.
3) Don't know, never thought about it.
4) I thought pink was a year round color.

desertkiwi
October 11th, 2006, 04:25 PM
**** NEWS FLASH ****

Tawni, ace reporter for SLF, uncovers the truth behind ILS's rapid decline. Contrary to popular theories, spiraling interest in ILS is NOT related to risk of injury, public fad syndrome, lack of trails, sexual orientation or men in Spandex, or any combination thereof. Rather, in a shocking revelation, for the first time, THE TRUTH IS KNOWN!

Be warned, the following information is graphic in nature and may not be suitable for the easily offended, nursing mothers, immature men, members of law enforcement or the deeply religious. May cause permanent retinal damage and/or lifelong disturbing dreams. By clicking below, you explicity agree that no liability is assumed by this reporter for any incidental or consequential damages that may result by clicking here... (http://home.earthlink.net/~tawni94681/nakedskate_pg.jpg)

masters_sk8tr
October 11th, 2006, 04:28 PM
Glad I'm not in a pace line with that dude...

tjw
October 11th, 2006, 05:07 PM
In visiting websites I find one thing which seems to be common in many of them.
It is the,"people look and think...", "Have you had someone look...", "This person says to me..." syndromes.
Who cares what people think, if you're not impeding their way of life. You do for yourself to please yourself, if you can't handle the critcism of being unique; you should not be doing it. In the US, obesity is almost a pandemic, so it is obvious any type of exercise or activity is unique.
I am in show business and nothing is more self-gratifing or self-effacing then this business.
I drive an exotic car, inlineskate, ski, snowboard, rock-wall climb(within reason), heavy into exercise; and individuals at websites involved in these types of activities are very pre-occupied with what others think. Who cares! Not bothering anyone, ENJOY YOURSELF!
Also, remember, fitness skaters are the most versatile skaters,PERIOD!

maherwoman
October 11th, 2006, 07:02 PM
In visiting websites I find one thing which seems to be common in many of them.
It is the,"people look and think...", "Have you had someone look...", "This person says to me..." syndromes.
Who cares what people think, if you're not impeding their way of life. You do for yourself to please yourself, if you can't handle the critcism of being unique; you should not be doing it. In the US, obesity is almost a pandemic, so it is obvious any type of exercise or activity is unique.
I am in show business and nothing is more self-gratifing or self-effacing then this business.
I drive an exotic car, inlineskate, ski, snowboard, rock-wall climb(within reason), heavy into exercise; and individuals at websites involved in these types of activities are very pre-occupied with what others think. Who cares! Not bothering anyone, ENJOY YOURSELF!
Also, remember, fitness skaters are the most versatile skaters,PERIOD!

I like the way you think! That's awesome!

You're right, who the heck cares. We're having tons of fun, and those that don't want to join us, either from laziness or just plain disinterest and lack of passion about life...well, they can shove their opinions where the sun don't shine! :D

The bottom line is, let's see THEM out there, and THEN hear what they have to say! I'm still waiting for what my most recent nay-sayer will say, since my flying past her in the rink last night and showing her in general what I'm made of! Hehe...:D

But, yes, ultimately it doesn't matter. It would never affect my love for the sport of skating (which is putting the sport incredibly generally, I know), except maybe to make me work even harder. I've spent most of my life being incredibly invalidated for the things I love, and thus have a much tougher skin for it.

Though what my recent rude nay-sayer had to say slightly pissed me off, it didn't surprise me. It takes a certain kind of person to make fun of forms of exercise...and they're mainly people that DON'T. I will say that she only lasted about 45 minutes at the rink last night, due to how out-of-shape she is...and this is quite the thin person, too. She just doesn't exercise, and thus has no endurance or conditioning. :p

In the end, none of it matters, and skating is still one of my passions. That will never change. :)

"Shoo fly, don't bother me!" Hehe...:)

Code Monkey
October 11th, 2006, 07:09 PM
Oh my retinas hurt!!! .... Really bad.

skaterdog
October 11th, 2006, 08:24 PM
I think guys that skate with no pants on are the reason that inline skating will never be an Olympic sport. I'm against it.

tjw
October 11th, 2006, 09:35 PM
Against it becoming a sport, so you can still skate with your pants off?

online inline
October 13th, 2006, 05:31 AM
In visiting websites I find one thing which seems to be common in many of them.
It is the,"people look and think...", "Have you had someone look...", "This person says to me..." syndromes.
Who cares what people think, if you're not impeding their way of life. You do for yourself to please yourself, if you can't handle the critcism of being unique; you should not be doing it. In the US, obesity is almost a pandemic, so it is obvious any type of exercise or activity is unique.
I am in show business and nothing is more self-gratifing or self-effacing then this business.
I drive an exotic car, inlineskate, ski, snowboard, rock-wall climb(within reason), heavy into exercise; and individuals at websites involved in these types of activities are very pre-occupied with what others think. Who cares! Not bothering anyone, ENJOY YOURSELF!
Also, remember, fitness skaters are the most versatile skaters,PERIOD!

yes, i like the way you think also, and i share your attitude, but just to a point. And the point is, some skaters regret the declining popularity of the sport, and to the extent that negative perceptions about the sport contribute to the declining popularity, we as skaters become sensitive to those negative perceptions.

No, i don't really care what anyone else thinks of skating, truth be told, but i would like to curb the trend of disappearing skate events. Every race/event i know has been touched by it - Long Beach inline marathon gone, Cactus clasic gone, all three of my regional races are in jeopardy of not being held next year, Duluth is no longer a WIC event. The list goes on. Those are events i care about and participate in. So when the topic of what people thing about skating comes up, i listen, only in so far as i want a clue as to why our numbers are decling and our events are vanishing.

tjw
October 13th, 2006, 03:24 PM
Running is as cheap a sport you can get into, that is why it is so popular. It has been proven time and time again that running shoes or cross-training shoes are pretty good no matter how much you pay. It has great health benefits but to me is as boring as it gets. In time, it is extremely debilitating to your legs. As in any sport related activity there are plenty of out of shape runners.
Inline skates are another story. There are some great deals out there, but, less expensive inlines do not compare to higher line inlines. It costs more to get into the sport. It is low impact and almost burns as many calories per hour as running. Also, keep in mind the intensity of your workout matters no matter what you do.

My inline time is my cardio, I work out every day starting at 5:30am. The time I cannot inline, I use a NordicTrack and love it.
I like skating because I enjoy the control and balance and the speed. I have one hill where I skate that I was clocked at 48 mph going down it, that is fast as I want to go. I have new K2 Moto Extremes, not because I feel they have any particular benefit, but because I liked their look and the bigger size wheels change it up for me. I have been skating on 80mm K2 VO2 MAX with abec 9 bearings. I keep them up and they look and perform like brand new. The new skates keep it interesting for me. Also, I like skating alone; it is almost like meditation time.

I have the day off so I rambled on a bit,sorry. For speed skaters you have your sources. For fitness skaters, we have K2 and Rollerblade for the most part. As long as they keep on making inlines, I will keep on skating.

badnews
October 13th, 2006, 04:11 PM
As long as they keep on making inlines, I will keep on skating.

You should buy about ten pairs of inline skates (depending on your age) just in case they stop making them, you will be able to continue to skate.

Well, that's what I'd do anyways.

sk8scott
October 14th, 2006, 01:38 AM
yes, i like the way you think also, and i share your attitude, but just to a point. And the point is, some skaters regret the declining popularity of the sport, and to the extent that negative perceptions about the sport contribute to the declining popularity, we as skaters become sensitive to those negative perceptions.

No, i don't really care what anyone else thinks of skating, truth be told, but i would like to curb the trend of disappearing skate events. Every race/event i know has been touched by it - Long Beach inline marathon gone, Cactus clasic gone, all three of my regional races are in jeopardy of not being held next year, Duluth is no longer a WIC event. The list goes on. Those are events i care about and participate in. So when the topic of what people thing about skating comes up, i listen, only in so far as i want a clue as to why our numbers are decling and our events are vanishing.

Bingo! Now *that* is why I got worked-up enough about some ignorant joke to start this whole thread in the first place. Events that once were hugely popular are now disappearing, and it's progressively harder to find like-minded folks on 8 or 10 wheels in many parts of this country.

It's one thing if I'm unpopular - I'm used to that! ;) When there's some perception that might be making the sport unpopular, that's an issue worth thinking about.

----Scott

hungryrollerblader
October 14th, 2006, 05:07 AM
You should buy about ten pairs of inline skates (depending on your age) just in case they stop making them, you will be able to continue to skate.

Well, that's what I'd do anyways.

If they stop making them, I'll dig a pair out of the garbage, or make one out of legos if I have to! (I hope I didn't just jinx myself."



PS: Aggressive inline skating, which happens to be my "discipline" is only labeled "gay" by certain punk skateboarders. And those particular dudes are usually the ones that look like hippies.

PPS: How can it be "gay" if I use my skills to impress girls, when I get the chance?

online inline
October 14th, 2006, 05:46 AM
Bingo! Now *that* is why I got worked-up enough about some ignorant joke to start this whole thread in the first place. Events that once were hugely popular are now disappearing, and it's progressively harder to find like-minded folks on 8 or 10 wheels in many parts of this country.

It's one thing if I'm unpopular - I'm used to that! ;) When there's some perception that might be making the sport unpopular, that's an issue worth thinking about.

----Scott

well it doesn;t add up- the sport hasn't changed much in terms of being masucline or effeminate in the last 15 years, yet it was wildly popular in the early to mid 90s, and has been steadily deciling since then. What changed? All i can figure is that didn't polyeurathane wheels start to come out in the early 90s and that may have jolted the sport into being more popluar?

speedysktr
October 14th, 2006, 09:57 AM
How can it be "gay" if I use my skills to impress girls, when I get the chance?
Because you're lying to yourself and just cant come to terms with it. Think about it, all of those awkward feelings, those times you just feel like crying, or how about those miatas? dont they look like a fun zippy car? Admit it, you imagine yourself driving around town, the top down, a nice pink chiffon scarf fluttering in the breeze and some Barbra Striesand playing full blast. It's okay, dude. Pull the rainbow sticker out of the dresser drawer and stand on the roof and scream: I love broadway musicals!!! You'll feel much better.

oh, btw<<sike>>

Jon B.
October 14th, 2006, 11:08 AM
Because you're lying to yourself and just cant come to terms with it. Think about it, all of those awkward feelings, those times you just feel like crying, or how about those miatas? dont they look like a fun zippy car? Admit it, you imagine yourself driving around town, the top down, a nice pink chiffon scarf fluttering in the breeze and some Barbra Striesand playing full blast. It's okay, dude. Pull the rainbow sticker out of the dresser drawer and stand on the roof and scream: I love broadway musicals!!! You'll feel much better. oh, btw<<sike>>
HEY! I love my Miata! .....and what's wrong with Barbara Streisand? She's not gay! She's been married too......and....and....her mom is a sex goddess! And my scarf is NOT pink, it's lavendar. Are you insinuating something? JB

speedysktr
October 14th, 2006, 11:11 AM
You just like them because you can tow it behind your hog.

zerio
October 14th, 2006, 11:32 AM
Ok..am no gay... but by no means homophobic.. but did have some problems as most of you.Even quit skating for sometime...I was pretty dummie:)

Sadly, the association of sport and sexual orientation is spread worldwidely and skating is seen as the gayest activity.

Most parents dont encourage their sons but their daughters only... however, most of them , cannot skate..so ..its much easier to encourage their kids to play basket ball, football,ride a bike... ...

THE PARENTS with reationary stupidity and narrowed minds think that sexual orientation is sorta a virus... probaly theyre crazy to jump off the closet...:)We all know we can choose the sports we want to join in but not our sexual oorientation.

All in all... I dont think that inline skating has declined due to this reason but because of mistaken marketing and trends only.Synchro skating has been growing fast... but note it only envolves girls. Ice figure skating reaches the highest number of tv watchers, but the girls on ice are the # 1!!! Try to get a black boot..and you must pay more... IE...Its cultural, though its a new millenium, we need some more time to have parents and public well informed and the web is right here to serve on this purpose as well. Nothing is static...and this is why we all enjoy skating , dont we?

Cheers