Thread: 1 skate for all
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Old June 20th, 2019, 08:43 PM   #9
Sir Aaron
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 457
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Quote:
Originally Posted by learning2sk8 View Post
Thanks for the reply Sir Aaron. We went to watch regionals in Waco and I noticed that everyone had different set ups for different events. Being old and poor, I was just wondering if anybody tried to get by with one "do-it-all" set up. Seems that is not very viable anymore.

Are you by chance with Chanpions? They have some amazing young skaters coming thru their program.
I am not with Champions (nor have I ever been). Champions is from Spring, Texas (outside Houston) and run by Keri Hefner. She has the top two dance skaters in the country. I'm no longer in Texas. I moved to Florida so my oldest daughter could skate full-time with her partner under the coach here. I am an assistant coach here (in Florida) on what I consider to be the best staff in skating. We have about 20 kids on our competitive team.

Virtually every kid and new adult starts off with a "do it all" set up. Usually a Riedell Angel setup then progresses to a Edea Rondo with a Roll Line Variant M plate. At an early level you aren't good enough to realize the difference in wheels, plates and boots...and frankly, with Roll Line plates there isn't much difference between most of frames anyways. There comes a point where we have to have the conversation (usually with parents) about getting better and multiple pairs of skates. Some kids still don't get multiple pairs and they are usually the ones who progress the slowest. (not just because of skates but if they don't pay for skates they probably wont pay for enough lessons either.)


Quote:
Originally Posted by learning2sk8 View Post
That is a very helpful reply. Actually, my wife has been skating for all her life and is just getting back into it after a 20 year layoff. The recommendations you give are what one of the top coaches in the area recommended for her (except wheels). I started skating just to go with her, and she originally wanted me to get a $100 skate figuring I would just dink around a bit and quit. I felt if I was going to go, I should at least have a decent leather boot, so bought the Riedell set up. It is a large learning curve, but I am trying to pick up what I can from watching/listening to others. It certainly is not as easy as it looks.

I have often heard that the person using one piece of equipment for several different things is either too poor to have more or knows how to use that one piece very well. There isn't a lot of chance I will ever progress to the top level, but hopefully I can get to a point where better equipment might enhance my abilities. From what I see, it appears that boots, plate, wheels, etc. for a single application run $500 or so minimum (a lot more is easily possible). So, for $1500 or so, a person can have three individual set ups. A person could have a custom boot with a nice plate and a couple of different wheels for that price or less. A semi custom boot or stock, like the 297 would lower cost considerably and give money for coaching. At least that is my thinking.
BLECH. And BLECH. Riedell 297s? Snyder Super Deluxe? The 297 is an extremely soft boot, IMO, and not suitable for much except for old-timers who prefer comfort over performance. Riedell is also going to be more expensive than EDEA. At least if you get a Riedell get a custom boot made or get an stiffer boot...like a bronze star. As for a plate....nobody, except old-timers, skates on a Snyder super deluxe. Ugh. That's like driving a low level Honda Civic for the same money you could drive a BMW. Why would you do that? Get a Roll Line Plate. Variant M if you don't want to spend much money. As for wheels, until you start doing turns, you really don't need slick wheels. Get a stickier dance wheel....Like a 95 ICE or maybe some white Komplex Bolero.

You probably don't need three pairs of skates. You need figure skates and "other" skates. But first and foremost, I'd start with one pair of really good skates and go from there. After a while you'll get a better feel for what you are able to do and what's right for you.
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