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Beginning Skaters Forum This is the place for beginning skaters to ask questions and share their stories. We would love to hear about your experiences learning to skate. No question is too dumb!

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Old April 7th, 2012, 07:37 PM   #1
Legacysage
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Default Exercises and techniques for the beginner skater?

Hiya!
I'm somewhat new to skating, and I after getting the some of the basics down pretty well, I was wondering what else I should be moving on to in order to better myself and perhaps become a bit more comfortable on wheels. What I've been doing thus far since the beginning of spring, is basically just getting cross-overs down, as well as working on getting comfortable with skating backwards.
While I SAY backwards, I'm not so sure it could really be considered SKATING backwards...Haha. More or less, I pretty much just do that A stance pump action to keep myself going. Also just got down a power stroke today, and totally redefined my deifnition of speed on skates!

What other maneuvers should I be practicing? I'e got most of the stops down... Haven't really transversed into power slides yet, as I haven't felt comfortable enough to do so... Though, I'll consider it if need be to improve my skating. I've some reaaaaalllly hard wheels that'll likely slide pretty nice, anyways (rain helps too). This can also extend into basic (Salom?) tricks, as I would like to improve my low speed control a bit more. Anything will help! Thanks for your time!
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Old April 7th, 2012, 08:39 PM   #2
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Simply skating on one foot. Forwards, backwards, straight, turning gently, turning sharply, and whilst moving free foot/hip to various places.

Once that's easy, then add one foot turns (three turns, brackets, counters, rockers, etc).
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Old April 7th, 2012, 08:51 PM   #3
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Here's another exercise that really improved my low speed control:

Start with the beginners Rocking Horse exercise. (Like swizzles, but just alternating between one swizzle forward, then one swizzle back).

Then stop half way (at the point of maximum leg separation, when both skates are going forward).

Now, instead of swizzling forward or back, swizzle one foot forward (push through the heel), and simultaneously swizzle the other foot backward (push through the toe). Should rotate on the spot. This should be done without any upper body twisting assistance at all. i.e. it should be effortless.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 08:56 PM   #4
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oh, and grapevine, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-swBB3LRKs

hint: the about "rotating swizzle" exercise could be the basis of a great grapevine.
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Old April 25th, 2012, 02:59 AM   #5
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Default InDoors or OutDoors

Hi Legacysage,

Went back to your starting post and it seems like you are an InLiner.

The answer depends on whether you skate indoors or outdoors on long stretches. I am guessing indoors since most outdoor InLiners don't do backwards.

If outdoors I would look up some of inlina's videos, and a few others including one gal I can't remember right now.

BTW Blacklace thanks for that GrapeVine Vid.

Yours in Skating, MA/NY Skating Dave
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Old May 10th, 2012, 02:50 AM   #6
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Default need help with a slide?

This is gonna sound really strange but as an aggressive inline skater, I found that alot of new things I learned on skates came from things that had nothing to do with skating. My footing I actually improved by free style break dancing to hip hop and R&B. feeling the rythem allowed me to feel more confedent whenever I needed to learn something new.
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Old June 2nd, 2012, 09:54 PM   #7
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I am also a beginner inline skater. I am a rec skater now, but would eventually like to try other types like speed skating. I know how to skate forward at about 5 miles per hour and I can stop using my heel break. I can turn by putting pressure on the outside leg and doing a snow plow. I can sort of do cross overs to turn, but I don't know how to sharply turn. It would really be helpful if there is a sticky of different maneuvers, a demonstration of what they look like, and how to learn them.

I did a search in the beginner section and there isn't really a good list of different stopping maneuvers, though I know they exist, and where I could find a good demonstrational video. Any help is appreciated.
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Old June 2nd, 2012, 11:36 PM   #8
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I would practice the T stop while you are still at manageable speeds.

-- some folks dont like the T stop because they feel it is bad for their wheels.

-- a sort of plow is good for stopping too.

-- also, the turn stop.

I believe that perfecting a number of stopping methods is best since you never know when one might come in handy.

Im still TERRIBLE at stopping!

Youtube is sometimes helpful. Here's a "T" stop But try NOT to let your knees go in.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSZI-bg9V9Y

ALSO - keep in mind that if you move to speed skating (umm, walking on eggshells here cause it's a touchy subject for some) - back breaks are not the norm and quiet dangerous. In fact, not allowed if you compete.

Best tip for begginners is to skate, skate, and skate some more. I agree tough...would be nice to have a sticky with methods/tips or something. There are so many opinions though that it might get all tangly anyway.
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Old June 3rd, 2012, 05:32 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phatnsassy View Post
I would practice the T stop while you are still at manageable speeds.

-- some folks dont like the T stop because they feel it is bad for their wheels.

I took a lesson today at a local rink and the guy had some really good advice for us doing T-stops: don't make it a perfect 90 T. Your rear foot should point just a little bit forward. The wheels will still drag and hop and make tha horrible sound - but they will also turn just a bit and not grind flat spots in as quickly. We practiced a bunch and got it working, to me it seemed like one case where bad form gives good results. (i.e. if you're making a perfect 90 T you're doing it too well.)
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Old June 3rd, 2012, 06:11 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plessans View Post
I am also a beginner inline skater. I am a rec skater now, but would eventually like to try other types like speed skating. I know how to skate forward at about 5 miles per hour and I can stop using my heel break. I can turn by putting pressure on the outside leg and doing a snow plow. I can sort of do cross overs to turn, but I don't know how to sharply turn. It would really be helpful if there is a sticky of different maneuvers, a demonstration of what they look like, and how to learn them.

I did a search in the beginner section and there isn't really a good list of different stopping maneuvers, though I know they exist, and where I could find a good demonstrational video. Any help is appreciated.
Google: Eddy Matzger
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Old June 5th, 2012, 03:00 AM   #11
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When you do speed, I notice we just roll out.coast until we slow down enough to stop. Uphills are good for slowing down too. I try to t-stop as little as possible, and when I do it is usually to slow down a bit, but never to a complete stop. If I have to stop fast, I hope there is a grassy embankment nearby to fall on. I don't have a heel brake.
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Old June 5th, 2012, 03:01 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowsk8 View Post
Google: Eddy Matzger
+1
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Old June 5th, 2012, 11:44 AM   #13
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Session skating will improve your skating. Sometimes i skate fast on my quads and weave in and out of the people. Or I play with the legions of derby people that show up to my Sunday evening session.

Formal lessons will also improve skating, but they cost more. Some rinks have a drop in for adults that is not real formal. There is one starting at my rink in the fall.

As for stopping on speed skates, it defeats the purpose of going fast. I don't like to stop to avoid things, I like to go around them.

When some one in the pace-line falls there is no time to stop, we either fall on top or go around quickly. I pref the go around, it hurts less.

But I can stop. Usually on quads I use my dance plugs so I do not flat a wheel. In competitions I t-stop. When I speed skate, I serpentinite to burn speed then plow stop usually.

Katy
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Old June 5th, 2012, 03:32 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KMA View Post

As for stopping on speed skates, it defeats the purpose of going fast. I don't like to stop to avoid things, I like to go around them.
When there is red traffic light I prefer to stop. (I'm also not brave enough to jump over cattle grids)
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Old June 5th, 2012, 05:11 PM   #15
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I had gotten good at the T-stop from my time as an aggressive skater, and not caring about my smaller hard wheels. Now, as a speed skater, I try to avoid it if I can on wheels I use for training, and completely on race wheels. However, I skate in an urban environment, so the t-stop is necessary if you aren't using a heel brake. It is good to have in your arsenal of skills. Also, the plow stop is good for slowing down, but don't expect to use it in an emergency.
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Old June 6th, 2012, 08:19 AM   #16
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T-Stop is an essential skill, not just for speed control, but also because it will develop your one-footed balance... If you have good one-footed balance then many things in skating will just come intuitively.

Don't worry about the wheels. It's worth the payoff.
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Old June 12th, 2012, 08:21 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KMA View Post
When some one in the pace-line falls there is no time to stop, we either fall on top or go around quickly. I pref the go around, it hurts less.

Katy
Does this happen???
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Old June 12th, 2012, 10:36 PM   #18
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I'm a beginner skater and believe that skating more will improve my skills naturally, but how do we know if we're forming bad habits? What exercises should we do to improve our overall skills? When I skate naturally I don't really focus on whether my skate is pointing straight ahead at the beginning of each stroke. That seems like a nuance suited for training to speed skate. I don't know if I'm being too stringent in how I'm learning to skate, but I have the basics and I just keep skating for the sake of skating: I can skate forward, heel stop, plow stop, plow turn, and sort of parallel turn. I can also cross over with my right leg, but that's it. Sometimes when skating I feel like I'm not shifting my weight directly over the skate, so it feels like I'm skating quickly to keep my body up because each leg starts at an angle with each push.
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Old June 13th, 2012, 06:06 AM   #19
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Your skills will impove naturally as you say...but there will always be room for improvement.

I think that just skating and skating and skating some more is a great place to start. At least you gain some skills and are comfortable on your wheels. I'd go for a lesson as soon as you feel comfortable enough though (since you sound eager to do it right).

You can then give yourself a focus WHILE skating naturally -- you can add an element or two of "proper technique" as you go.

My 2 cents. I'll leave it to the more experience skaters to actually answer your inquiry though. I'm a newbie too. hee hee
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Old June 13th, 2012, 04:06 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Legacysage View Post
Hiya!
I'm somewhat new to skating, and I after getting the some of the basics down pretty well, I was wondering what else I should be moving on to in order to better myself and perhaps become a bit more comfortable on wheels. What I've been doing thus far since the beginning of spring, is basically just getting cross-overs down, as well as working on getting comfortable with skating backwards.
While I SAY backwards, I'm not so sure it could really be considered SKATING backwards...Haha. More or less, I pretty much just do that A stance pump action to keep myself going. Also just got down a power stroke today, and totally redefined my deifnition of speed on skates!

What other maneuvers should I be practicing? I'e got most of the stops down... Haven't really transversed into power slides yet, as I haven't felt comfortable enough to do so... Though, I'll consider it if need be to improve my skating. I've some reaaaaalllly hard wheels that'll likely slide pretty nice, anyways (rain helps too). This can also extend into basic (Salom?) tricks, as I would like to improve my low speed control a bit more. Anything will help! Thanks for your time!
Off skate things that help skating:
In general anything that helps your core, crunches, situps, running etc.
For the things you mention:
Improve your one foot balance, standing on one foot, one foot knee bends etc.
And for over all balance one of these can help http://www.power-systems.com/p-2841-...ade-board.aspx.
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