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Ask DocSk8 (Expert Indoor Skate Building Advice) This forum is different then the other SkateLog forums in that it is not a discussion forum, but rather a place you can ask skate building expert Fred "DocSk8" Benjamin about building and repairing indoor speed, derby, and jamskate quad roller skates. Please start a new thread for each new question.

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Old October 19th, 2012, 01:26 PM   #161
jenningsthecat
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Thanks to Doc for the link!

After looking around the site a bit, I came up with the following:

http://www.klueber.com/en/applicatio...earings/#21906

The rated speed and temperature are WAY WAY higher than our skates will ever see, (unless we're skating in hell . But this grease is 'resistant to high pressure' - I assume that refers to high pressure between the balls and the races. I would imagine that some of the stuff we do puts some pretty high loads on our bearings, given the amount of thrust associated with 200-pounds-plus bouncing up and down on occasionally-two-wheels, or maybe even one wheel - that's a lot of PSI. Add in the side loading that goes along with tight edges, and I would guess that skate bearings see loads that are quite different from yer average industrial application.

Too bad the site doesn't have pics of the grease...
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Old October 21st, 2012, 11:24 AM   #162
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I used to favour mineral spirits, (Varsol and the like), but my skin is starting to get a bit sensitive to it, and I hate using gloves. I also don't like the smell, and the fact that, when I use it in the house, the vapour condenses everywhere and I end up smelling it all over again when I turn on the stove or use the toaster.

I started using 99% isopropyl alcohol, but it left a patina on the bearings that looked suspiciously like rust. I think it probably was rust, given that alcohol is hydrophilic, and also evaporates fast, which cools the bearings, which can lead to condensation. And in my experience, some bearings seem to acquire a coating of oxidation really fast - I'm talking minutes.

Now I use isopropyl alcohol mixed with oil, about 5% to 10% - I'm not too picky about the exact ratio. This leaves a thin film of fresh oil that protects the bearings, and leaves them shinier than alcohol alone did.

As for lube, I used to use 90-weight gear oil, and it seemed to be fine. But my 3-month-old Qube 8's, (which I haven't cleaned yet, so they have the original factory grease in them), roll so much better than my old bearings that I'll try to get something as close to factory-original grease as I can when I clean them. (Speaking of which, does anybody here know what kind of grease is used in the Qube 8's, and where I can get some?)

I thought my old bearings, (a mix of Swiss Bones and Fafnirs), were fairly good, but when I started skating on the Qube 8's they rolled so much better that it actually took a couple of sessions to get used to them. I used to believe oil was best, and figured grease was just for outdoor skating, but now I've had to reconsider...
Referring to the bolded part: isn't that effectively what WD-40 is? (though IIRC WD-40 has naptha or similar as the carrier for the oil rather than alcohol?)
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Old March 25th, 2016, 02:09 AM   #163
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anybody tried toothpaste ?
i have ceramic bearings, they dont rust, except the metal bearing casing. still havent cleaned them
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Old March 25th, 2016, 04:10 PM   #164
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anybody tried toothpaste ?
i have ceramic bearings, they dont rust, except the metal bearing casing. still havent cleaned them
Care to expand on that?? I am not familiar with a bearing "casing". The typical hybrid ceramic bearing used in sk8s consist of steel inner and outer races, a plastic crown and ceramic (either Si3N4 or ZrO2) balls. If the races are rusting on the outside, the could very easily be rusting on the inside.

Tooth paste is an abrasive agent much like automotive rubbing and polishing compounds or the emery and rouge used by jewelers. I am certain it would quickly change the tolerances on the metal parts and not in a good way.
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Old March 26th, 2016, 10:32 AM   #165
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Care to expand on that?? I am not familiar with a bearing "casing". The typical hybrid ceramic bearing used in sk8s consist of steel inner and outer races, a plastic crown and ceramic (either Si3N4 or ZrO2) balls. If the races are rusting on the outside, the could very easily be rusting on the inside.

Tooth paste is an abrasive agent much like automotive rubbing and polishing compounds or the emery and rouge used by jewelers. I am certain it would quickly change the tolerances on the metal parts and not in a good way.
hmm, i really dont know the material.. i'll try to take some pictures soon and post here. i dont even know how to remove all the bearing parts completely.
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Old March 26th, 2016, 02:46 PM   #166
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hmm, i really dont know the material.. i'll try to take some pictures soon and post here. i dont even know how to remove all the bearing parts completely.

Then don't.

First off, if you really want to tear them all the way down, do them one @ a time. The parts will not mix and match well. Next, getting one back together is bad enough. I have done a few over the years, but do not see any benefit in taking the all the way down. They don't get any cleaner that I can discern.

But please, do post up pix of your bearings.
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Old March 28th, 2016, 02:05 AM   #167
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here it is. 7 ball
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Old March 28th, 2016, 05:05 PM   #168
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Default And the answer is.

Those are hybrid bearings, steel races and ZrO2 (Zirconium Oxide) white ceramic balls. ZrO2 is the less expensive and less strong ceramic ball option. It is easier and less expensive to make. ZrO2 is fired in an atmosphere vented kiln. The good stuff, Si3N4 (Silicon Nitride) black or gray ceramic balls is harder, more durable and much harder to make. It is typically fired in a pressurized kiln or hot isostatic press (HIP). I can also be fired buried in a powder of similar characteristics but larger particle sizes, to minimize the extra powder sintering itself to the parts being fired. I suspect bearing balls are fired in a pressurized kiln or HIP.

Anyway, I don't recommend doing a lot of jam sk8ing on those. ZrO2 does not like shock.
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Old April 1st, 2016, 05:10 AM   #169
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Those are hybrid bearings, steel races and ZrO2 (Zirconium Oxide) white ceramic balls. ZrO2 is the less expensive and less strong ceramic ball option. It is easier and less expensive to make. ZrO2 is fired in an atmosphere vented kiln. The good stuff, Si3N4 (Silicon Nitride) black or gray ceramic balls is harder, more durable and much harder to make. It is typically fired in a pressurized kiln or hot isostatic press (HIP). I can also be fired buried in a powder of similar characteristics but larger particle sizes, to minimize the extra powder sintering itself to the parts being fired. I suspect bearing balls are fired in a pressurized kiln or HIP.

Anyway, I don't recommend doing a lot of jam sk8ing on those. ZrO2 does not like shock.
Yep you're right. i used the bearings on some wheels that were deformed, not completely round and on rough tarmac... now the bearings started making sounds and can't spin as much as original... really hate those bad quality wheels, have changed them. so i was thinking cleaning may help but i dont know how to remove them nor do i find any proper tutorial on youtube to clean these bearings, being ceramics.
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Old April 1st, 2016, 07:35 PM   #170
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Yep you're right. i used the bearings on some wheels that were deformed, not completely round and on rough tarmac... now the bearings started making sounds and can't spin as much as original... really hate those bad quality wheels, have changed them. so i was thinking cleaning may help but i dont know how to remove them nor do i find any proper tutorial on youtube to clean these bearings, being ceramics.
Removing the seals on both sides is as far as you need to disassemble the bearing. A map tack or thin # 2 X-acto knife blade gently under the inner seal lip should do it. Pry gently with the flat size of the blade. Then solvent. A shaker bottle is an OK start. After getting big pieces out in the shaker bottle, blow them dry with compressed air. Then rinse them with carburetor cleaner.. the aerosol stuff in a can. Back to the compressed air. Really you need access to an air compressor, the dusting spray canned air is not real suitable. Once they are dry, lube 'em up and reinstall your seals..

Are your seals flat?? If they are bent, (usually from crushing them with the end of a socket) they will rub on the crown inside and slow ya down for real...so flatten them out.
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 05:55 AM   #171
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Removing the seals on both sides is as far as you need to disassemble the bearing. A map tack or thin # 2 X-acto knife blade gently under the inner seal lip should do it. Pry gently with the flat size of the blade. Then solvent. A shaker bottle is an OK start. After getting big pieces out in the shaker bottle, blow them dry with compressed air. Then rinse them with carburetor cleaner.. the aerosol stuff in a can. Back to the compressed air. Really you need access to an air compressor, the dusting spray canned air is not real suitable. Once they are dry, lube 'em up and reinstall your seals..

Are your seals flat?? If they are bent, (usually from crushing them with the end of a socket) they will rub on the crown inside and slow ya down for real...so flatten them out.
appreciate your reply. i have removed the seals on 1 side because the seals are in contact with the frame although being flat. so when i tighten too tight, the wheels wont move. not cuz of the bearing but the contact with the seal.

unfortunately i dont have any compress air. only hair dryer which i can remove the heat lol. i need to find the right type of solvent. so you dont suggest i remove all the pieces altogether ? i dont have the right type of oil either. i'll google a bit
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Old April 3rd, 2016, 03:42 PM   #172
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appreciate your reply. i have removed the seals on 1 side because the seals are in contact with the frame although being flat. so when i tighten too tight, the wheels wont move. not cuz of the bearing but the contact with the seal.

Can you shoot some pix of the clearance issue?/ Something does not sound correct here.

unfortunately i dont have any compress air. only hair dryer which i can remove the heat lol. i need to find the right type of solvent. so you dont suggest i remove all the pieces altogether ? i dont have the right type of oil either. i'll google a bit

Read back through here. I have described a hot water method of doing this where the water pressure subs for the compressed air.
Lubing bearings is something that has a whole lot of voodoo associated with it. A lot of people have made a lot of money selling the next great thing in lubricants. 3in1 oil is fine. Light grease is fine too, unless you are going for ultimate speed and like cleaning your bearings a lot more often.
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Old April 5th, 2016, 02:54 PM   #173
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Default My method goes like this

Bearings kida suck.

Clean bearings

oil bearings

bearings still suck

buy new bearings (I just buy reds cause I know I'm going to replace them anyway)


I envy you mechanicle types.
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Old April 5th, 2016, 03:38 PM   #174
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Bearings kida suck.

Clean bearings

9 times out of 10 your bearings are not as clean as you think you got them.

oil bearings

bearings still suck

See comment above.


buy new bearings (I just buy reds cause I know I'm going to replace them anyway)


I envy you mechanicle types.
So try this. Take your new reds and clean the "speed spooge" out of them. Spray carburetor cleaner is dandy for this purpose. Let 'em dry and pack them with a little grease. You can find all sorts of info on this all over the forum. Ignore the folks that say grease does not work. They either did it incorrectly or were trolling. The grease will greatly minimize your need to clean or replace.

Or if you are running 8mm bearings member the california kid has some good deals on NMB bearings. NMBs are on my list of bearings that work as well or better than the high priced sk8 brands.

Also beware of Bones bearings that are priced too low to be believed. They are fakes made in China. Yeah I know reds are made in China, but these are not authentic Bones.
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Old April 5th, 2016, 09:42 PM   #175
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So try this. Take your new reds and clean the "speed spooge" out of them. Spray carburetor cleaner is dandy for this purpose. Let 'em dry and pack them with a little grease. You can find all sorts of info on this all over the forum. Ignore the folks that say grease does not work. They either did it incorrectly or were trolling. The grease will greatly minimize your need to clean or replace.

Or if you are running 8mm bearings member the california kid has some good deals on NMB bearings. NMBs are on my list of bearings that work as well or better than the high priced sk8 brands.

Also beware of Bones bearings that are priced too low to be believed. They are fakes made in China. Yeah I know reds are made in China, but these are not authentic Bones.
Ok, I'll try it, I have packed bearings for other things. I usually spend about $20.00 for 8 reds Does that seem the right price?
They last about a year. Then I switch them to my outdoor wheels. Then they are toast.
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Old April 5th, 2016, 10:15 PM   #176
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Ok, I'll try it, I have packed bearings for other things. I usually spend about $20.00 for 8 reds Does that seem the right price?

Looks like full retail so, if they are counterfeit, you are getting really smoked..

They last about a year.

Most likely real then.

Then I switch them to my outdoor wheels. Then they are toast.
Yeah outdoors is not a place to use oiled bearings. Don't go nuts with the grease either.
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Old April 7th, 2016, 08:35 AM   #177
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Good simple tutorial on how to remove bearing counter parts and reassemble.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXYhICENut4

im gona start cleaning all my bearings, i have loads. abec 5- 7 - 9 to ilq-9.
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Old April 7th, 2016, 05:30 PM   #178
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Originally Posted by hyperiuSupern0va View Post
Good simple tutorial on how to remove bearing counter parts and reassemble.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXYhICENut4

im gona start cleaning all my bearings, i have loads. abec 5- 7 - 9 to ilq-9.
It is not as easy as it looks. I quit doing that for routine cleaning years ago. I love you tube. Interesting he did not show you how he cleaned the bearings..
Soooo many experts posting up their version of the "correct" way to do things on you tube.
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Old April 8th, 2016, 10:08 AM   #179
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It is not as easy as it looks. I quit doing that for routine cleaning years ago. I love you tube. Interesting he did not show you how he cleaned the bearings..
Soooo many experts posting up their version of the "correct" way to do things on you tube.
Hey Doc

yeah there are so many "correct" ways. I just did the "sensible" way, which is easy really.
i was surprised my bearings were really messy.

1. remove and separate the items. seals and plastic retainers to 1 side. bearings and metal casing to 1 side.
2. dump the bearings and metal parts into solvent. in my case i used thinner. use an air tight container. some plastics dissolve under solvents, so only use metal parts.

3. retainers and seals being non metal, i washed them with soap.
tip: simply hold the retainer/seal towards the bottom of the sink allowing water dropping from the tap to remove the dirt by pressure. instead of using a toothbrush or cloth to wipe them.

4. pour the solvent away and pour the bearings/metal casing onto a cloth rag. simply pressing/rolling ur bearing towards the rag will dry it yet remove some dirt stuck.

6. use tissue or cloth to wipe the inner part of the bearing casing, some dirt may still be stuck.

7. let everything dry completely before assembling. you can leave everything on a cloth rag.

8. once dry, re-assemble. lightly lubricate without the seal. apply the seal later on, to not only allow bearing to be lubricated better, you dont want moisture on the sides or outer part of seals as this will attract dirt to the interior.
Done.
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Old April 8th, 2016, 03:25 PM   #180
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Default Sooooo

How long did this take??
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