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Fitness Skating and Training Forum Discussions about on-skate and off-skate training, hydration, sports nutrition, weight loss, injuries, sports medicine, and other topics related to training and physical fitness for skaters.

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Old September 15th, 2014, 07:05 PM   #1
StuartH
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Default Skating with missing ligament

Hi I'm new to the forum but have a question I need some help with:

I ruptured my atfl (anterior tibio-fibula ligament) about 18 months ago. I do a lot of cycling and didn't really realise something was wrong until about a year ago. I used to skate, and skate a lot on quads and inline hockey skates.

I've had an arthroscopy a few months back to trim out some bone spurs that had built up since the rupture. I'm now back to where I was pre-op but still without the ligament on the outside of my left ankle.

I'd like to get back to skating for fitness and having fun with my kids. It would seem that my doctors are not keen to reconstruct the ligament as I've coped without it for long enough and there is nothing left to reattach!

Anybody have any luck skating with this limitation? Do you reckon I could still skate?

Ironically when I stopped skating 6-7 years ago it was because this ligament was about to rupture completely.....but didn't!
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Old September 15th, 2014, 09:13 PM   #2
Foot2big
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Wow, sounds like if you're going to get back into it, you'll be looking for a boot with HEAVY ankle support.


To my knowledge these offer the most ankle support in a hardshell boot/liner combo. I run wheels from 56mm all the way up to 90mm (72mm and 57mm shown in the pic)

I have a questionable left ankle that flares up from time to time ONLY WHEN I DON'T HAVE A SKATE ON! Put my boots on and the pain is gone. Weird.

YRMV but good luck!
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Old September 15th, 2014, 10:18 PM   #3
WJCIV
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Disclaimer: I don't know anatomy, so I don't really know what that ligament does.

I would suspect that quad skating would be difficult. Going around corners requires you to bend your ankle sideways. Inlines require front and back bend, which doesn't seem to be as much of an issue from what you have described. There are options in this regard. You can get the type of boot Foot2big suggests. There are semi-race options with articulating cuffs. You may even be able to get a speed boot and heat mold it around a traditional ankle brace. You might contact Jimmy Blair (a member who hangs out in the speed forum) if you go this route. He makes boots, including customs, and might have some ideas that are a lot better than my generic "heat mold 'em".
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Old September 16th, 2014, 08:30 AM   #4
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I am not a doc either, but one thing I have learnt from physiologists like Maffetone & Friel is that overly supportive footwear has the undesired effect of weakening your foot and supportive structures, contributing to injury... that is why they recommend a minimal shoe.

I think that there was a post in the speed skate forum a few years back that pointed out that a skater with a disability actually found a minimal boot (Simmons) to be easier to skate in than a more supportive boot (Bont Semi). I will see if I can dig it out.

If you are keen to skate again then don't let anything stop you. If you can run and jog ok then there's no reason why you shouldn't be able to skate imo. there is a guy with a prosthetic leg who regularly does the skate marathons in Europe.
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Old September 16th, 2014, 08:31 AM   #5
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http://www.skatelogforum.com/forums/...5&postcount=17
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Old September 16th, 2014, 01:44 PM   #6
StuartH
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Cool! Many thanks for that. I'd like to get into speed skating so I will look into these boots.

My days of jumping down stairs and hurdling car bonnets on quads are over but I could give this a go.
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Old September 16th, 2014, 03:26 PM   #7
WJCIV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilzzz View Post
I am not a doc either, but one thing I have learnt from physiologists like Maffetone & Friel is that overly supportive footwear has the undesired effect of weakening your foot and supportive structures, contributing to injury... that is why they recommend a minimal shoe.
That's because when you don't use them muscles they atrophy, or at least don't keep up in development with the muscles around them. Then they are more likely to be unable to handle the stress when it is applied or overwhelmed by forces exerted by surrounding muscles. It's why there are many advocates of not using weight belts to support the core (weightlifting) or ankle or knee braces (volleyball/basketball).

This situation seems different to me because you are not worried about the muscle atrophying. It's missing. Maybe another muscle can take it's place. I don't know.
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Last edited by WJCIV; September 16th, 2014 at 10:17 PM. Reason: able -> unable
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Old September 16th, 2014, 08:31 PM   #8
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Part of the reason I kept cycling for so long (I race BMX) was that I had built up so much calf strength that it compensated for the lack of ligament and the first specialist I saw told me just to get on with it. It was only after the unpredictable ankle giving way at the wrong moment that made them look at the problem.

I am looking at a reconstruction by all likely outcomes but wondered if for some reason they didn't give me the surgery whether I could still find a way to skate to a healthy level
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