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Inline Artistic Discussions about artistic skating on inline figure skates.

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Old September 29th, 2008, 01:19 PM   #1
firefly
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Unhappy Impact

Was wondering....on jump landings (especially doubles and triples):

On ice, the "correct" way to land is to "break" the landings with the pick then glide out on the edge. The pick is supposed to take most of the impact so there are fewer injuries to back, hips, knees, ankles over time.

On roller, all "jump plates" (snyder, atlas etc.) have the rubber washers, (or whatever you call them), to slightly cushion the impact since roller "sticks" the landings over a flat foot and doesn't "break" with the toe like ice. Of course, roller wheels seem to be made of a "harder" material than inlines...

On inlines, it seems that the wheels, themselves, (being of a softer, more rubbery material) take the impact (since we stick the landings over a flat foot like roller).

Is there any way to further cushion the impact on inlines? Maybe make something like a jump plate for them? It seems that only the wheels, themselves, are taking the impact. Although, my landings are nowhere as "hard" as my old (incorrect, "flat" landings on ice), I do feel them more than I used to on roller and they're starting to hurt!!! Granted, this could be from age and weight , but I do think a jump plate on inlines, if possible, might be a good idea. What do you think?
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Old September 29th, 2008, 02:16 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firefly View Post
Was wondering....on jump landings (especially doubles and triples):

On ice, the "correct" way to land is to "break" the landings with the pick then glide out on the edge. The pick is supposed to take most of the impact so there are fewer injuries to back, hips, knees, ankles over time.

On roller, all "jump plates" (snyder, atlas etc.) have the rubber washers, (or whatever you call them), to slightly cushion the impact since roller "sticks" the landings over a flat foot and doesn't "break" with the toe like ice. Of course, roller wheels seem to be made of a "harder" material than inlines...

On inlines, it seems that the wheels, themselves, (being of a softer, more rubbery material) take the impact (since we stick the landings over a flat foot like roller).

Is there any way to further cushion the impact on inlines? Maybe make something like a jump plate for them? It seems that only the wheels, themselves, are taking the impact. Although, my landings are nowhere as "hard" as my old (incorrect, "flat" landings on ice), I do feel them more than I used to on roller and they're starting to hurt!!! Granted, this could be from age and weight , but I do think a jump plate on inlines, if possible, might be a good idea. What do you think?

It is funny to bring this subject to the table, I had wondered if you have the ability to move as a bit here or there, just what would happen. My suggestion, although here there is the greats like: Rick, or Bobnva a few others whose names escape me (age again), but Roll Line, and I know they don't make inlines anymore or used or maybe will, but they took it to the science, and if anyone is able to talk (being one the best) on this subject, it will be Roll line.
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Old September 29th, 2008, 02:35 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firefly View Post
Was wondering....on jump landings (especially doubles and triples):

On ice, the "correct" way to land is to "break" the landings with the pick then glide out on the edge. The pick is supposed to take most of the impact so there are fewer injuries to back, hips, knees, ankles over time.

On roller, all "jump plates" (snyder, atlas etc.) have the rubber washers, (or whatever you call them), to slightly cushion the impact since roller "sticks" the landings over a flat foot and doesn't "break" with the toe like ice. Of course, roller wheels seem to be made of a "harder" material than inlines...

On inlines, it seems that the wheels, themselves, (being of a softer, more rubbery material) take the impact (since we stick the landings over a flat foot like roller).

Is there any way to further cushion the impact on inlines? Maybe make something like a jump plate for them? It seems that only the wheels, themselves, are taking the impact. Although, my landings are nowhere as "hard" as my old (incorrect, "flat" landings on ice), I do feel them more than I used to on roller and they're starting to hurt!!! Granted, this could be from age and weight , but I do think a jump plate on inlines, if possible, might be a good idea. What do you think?

i would say the jump is absored by the cushions, wheels and worst of all the joints, ankles, knees, hips and backs in roller. not sure if they can come out with something else on the plates to help, a suspension system or something like a car lol. to be serious though a bent knee also helps a bit too. dont really know what else they can do to make it better.
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Old September 29th, 2008, 04:20 PM   #4
Wendy Hammond
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am sure that I read in some inline rules that you should not be penalised for using toe stop to assist coming out of jumps (to help prevent damage to knees) - however when I enquired in UK I was told would get better marks for landing flat foot
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Old September 29th, 2008, 08:26 PM   #5
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rwsz,
The quads were not so bad because the cushions (rubber washers?) were built into the jump plates

BUT....

inlines don't have anything like a jump plate (at least not mine.) It is just metal housing and wheels. Now, the wheels are "softer" than my quads (Bones) used to be. (More rubbery material). So they do give a little, but the landings are "hard." I can actually feel the jolt through my body. Not as bad as a flat landing on ice, but bad enough....
Yes, I think the bended knee helps. Also, I tend to work my jumps too long. (Ice coach noticed this.) Will try bending knee more and limiting jumping during practice sessions.

Wendy,
Yes, I think Joe K. mentioned something about toe landings but ...um... don't think it's going to work on roller. Roller has to "stick" the landings over the flat foot so there is ride out. Landing on the toe will stop your momentum completely and throw you forward. There is no way to get a decent ride out on an edge (like ice) if you land on the toestop. On roller this type of landing (toe landing) is usually the result of leaning forward too much on takeoff or breaking forward (at the waist) in the air. It is a mistake: A fault in jump technique. (I know because it's a error I tend to make on 2flip and 2lutz when I'm not careful.)

Checked out a few inline artistic frames and none seem to have a jump plate in the sense of quads. Um....Of course, I'm not a designer/engineer so maybe it's not possible.

The impact thing is not too bad because, like I said, the inline wheels give a bit. If I loose a few pounds (which I need to do anyways), there will be less weight comming down and that will help a bit.
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Old September 30th, 2008, 01:07 AM   #6
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Smile Toe Landings

Bent knees definitely make a difference. In the last year I have really focused on the bent knee and it has made a noticeable difference. You really need to either have a coach work with you or have your move video-taped. The brain, or at least my brain, tends to think my knee is much more bent than it really is. My sit spins looked more like scratch spins until I made bent knees my primary focus.


As far as toe landings on quads I do agree that it creates more problems on quads. The toe tends to grab on quads. On ice I find I can rotate more easily instead of coming to a stop or becoming unbalanced. Sometimes my jumps like the salchow and toeloop rotate on landing. My ice coach actually looks for the little curve from the pick to see if I did the jump right. Dragging the toe pick doesn't have the same impact as dragging the toe stop. The same applies for my takeoffs.

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rwsz,
... Yes, I think the bended knee helps. Also, I tend to work my jumps too long. (Ice coach noticed this.) Will try bending knee more and limiting jumping during practice sessions.

...
Wendy,
Yes, I think Joe K. mentioned something about toe landings but ...um... don't think it's going to work on roller. ...
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Old September 30th, 2008, 11:43 AM   #7
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Joe,
Yes, I have found jump landings and spin edges are very different on inlines than on ice (read that "roller style"). The skater must "stick" the inline landings (like quads do); that is, land flat footed, ideally in a forward check position, unlike ice that tends to "unwrap" the jump as they (ideally) reach for the landing with the toe pick. It's not just the foot/body position on landing, but the actual timing of the jump is different in the air. (I never really "got" this on ice, so I landed "flat." Flat landngs on roller are ideal, but on ice they make your jumps "curl." Also, the impact of steel on ice is incredible. Ouch!! Think I bruised my spleen a few times.)

Anyway, like I said, on roller we are supposed to land flat. That is why there are rubber "cushions" built into freestyle plates. http://www.skate-buys.com/snydquadarsk.html (Enlarge picture. See the black rubber washers/cushions?)
They're yellow on this one, but you get the idea. http://www.skate-buys.com/atlasfreestyle.html


My inlines don't seem to have these "cushions." As far as I can tell checking out the pictures of artistic inline frames and reading about them, none of the major manufactures have them. (I could be wrong here.) Was wondering if it's possible to design an inline "jump" plate to lessen the impact.
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