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Quad Vert All kinds of aggressive skating on quad roller skates including quad vertical roller skating, quad bowl skating, quad skatepark tricks, and street skating tricks in quad skates.

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Old March 31st, 2009, 08:34 PM   #1
biffsk8er
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Default Building new set up.

I got started a couple of days ago. The first day, I just worked on my UHMW sliders. Those are incredibly tough to cut. Last night, I started the construction mode. I cut skis for skate plates, and attached the following :

One skate boot, two skateboard riser pads, two ace skateboard trucks, one slider riser block, & one slider.

After I had them all positioned properly, I glued my riser block to the plate, glued the slider to the block, and bolted it all firmly in place to the plate. I am starting boot number two now, and and I should have that done by the end of today. If I move quick enough, I'll also grind down all the corners on the skis so that there are no sharp corners. I always do that last, so that I can shape the skis to the curves of my newly mounted boots.


I have pics, though they were taken in the dark. Sorry about that.


Boots, Ski plates, Slider UHMW, skate bolts, truck riser
pads, skateboard trucks, & riser block for the slider.
Wheels & Bearings not shown.


Side view. Note, the riser block has location markings.
Easier later to line up during final assembly.


A bottom view of the slider and trucks bolted on before detailing.
Note, the slider plate has the same location markings as the riser block.
Very important when assembling.


An end shot. Kinda hard to even see.


Slider plate after insetting bolt holes.
Slider riser block after cutting weight with 1'2" and 1/4" holes.


Close up of inset slider plate bolt holes and position markings.


Close up of inset slider plate bolt holes and position markings.
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Old March 31st, 2009, 08:37 PM   #2
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test....figured it out.
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Old April 1st, 2009, 09:18 AM   #3
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Default You should NOT GLUE these types of plastic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by biffsk8er View Post
test....figured it out.
biffsk8er,

You indicated you were GLUING UHMW plastic to plates. This is a tough type of POLYETHYLENE, and almost NO GLUE will bond strongly to it. A slider plate that is only glued is certain to be ripped off from the stresses. I would engineer some MECHANICAL ATTACHMENT to supplement any glue scheme.
I dont know if the riser material is, but it has bolt holes in addition to any glue, so that should not mater how well the glue sticks.

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Old April 1st, 2009, 04:04 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Armadillo View Post
You indicated you were GLUING UHMW plastic to plates. This is a tough type of POLYETHYLENE, and almost NO GLUE will bond strongly to it.
-Armadillo
The glue was mainly for the riser pad under the slider, with an additional purpose to inhibit slippage between the UHMW and the pad. I know that UHMW will not stick to glue well. I roughed up the surface before adhering it, but I do not expect a serious bond. It is also bolted, but a material that is that slippery could always use a little extra help.

Notice the last part of this sentence :
Quote:
After I had them all positioned properly, I glued my riser block to the plate, glued the slider to the block, and bolted it all firmly in place to the plate.
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 05:21 AM   #5
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Yeah, that is what the inset holes are for. To bolt it down. I read somewhere that the plastic can be penetrated by very few substances. That is why it can be used for food grade stuff because viruses and bacteria cant get IN it. I read up about welding it using a UHMW welder. Problem is if it gets too hot it reverts back to HDPE. The best ways to attached it I read about is mechanically. It is just not designed for gluing.

You are right it roughing it up though. You are creating little ridges for the glue to hold onto, but there will be no bonding to it.

Good job on the new setup. It looks good and solid. You are going to absolutely love how slick that stuff is!
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 06:26 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Demolishun View Post
Yeah, that is what the inset holes are for. To bolt it down. I read somewhere that the plastic can be penetrated by very few substances. That is why it can be used for food grade stuff because viruses and bacteria cant get IN it. I read up about welding it using a UHMW welder. Problem is if it gets too hot it reverts back to HDPE. The best ways to attached it I read about is mechanically. It is just not designed for gluing.

You are right it roughing it up though. You are creating little ridges for the glue to hold onto, but there will be no bonding to it.

Good job on the new setup. It looks good and solid. You are going to absolutely love how slick that stuff is!
Thanks! I'll be trying it out tomorrow to see if it can walk the walk! Errr.....slide the slide. LOL!

This will be my first day back skating since my quad tendon tear on Dec. 21 2008. Wish me luck! hahahaha.
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 09:02 AM   #7
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Default Glue will surely help with increasing friction

Quote:
Originally Posted by biffsk8er View Post
The glue was mainly for the riser pad under the slider, with an additional purpose to inhibit slippage between the UHMW and the pad. I know that UHMW will not stick to glue well. I roughed up the surface before adhering it, but I do not expect a serious bond. It is also bolted, but a material that is that slippery could always use a little extra help.

Notice the last part of this sentence :
I see the picture better now with your words than I could in the PICs.

I could not see any holes in the slider plate.

-Armadillo
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 02:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armadillo View Post
I see the picture better now with your words than I could in the PICs.

I could not see any holes in the slider plate.

-Armadillo
No biggee!

I'm going to try them out today at the local park.

Here are the skates after building them.
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 08:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biffsk8er View Post

What's the weight of one of those skates? They look like they would be as heavy as a brick.
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Old April 3rd, 2009, 06:19 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by RS Dave View Post
What's the weight of one of those skates? They look like they would be as heavy as a brick.
If I'm reading my scale right, they each weigh 4.8 pounds.

Question to all quad skaters - What do your skates weigh?
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Old May 13th, 2009, 10:16 PM   #11
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Default Heavy Yes, but Bricks They are Not

I have installed a new grind plate design on my skates (size 12). Each skate weighs 4lb 9 oz (about 4.56 lbs). I have been checking around on aggressivemall.com for a weight comparison of in-line aggressive skates. All weights are listed for a size 9. The heavy end is around 4lb 14 oz, and some of the light setups weigh only 3lb 6oz. Price has no correlation to weight.

So, Biff, our skates are on the heavy end of the scale but not quite the extreme end. You have a nice setup that works well for you, and your posted videos are proof positive of that. You should not feel like your feet are all that heavy. However, your skates have enough solid mass that a little strategic swiss-cheesing could yield a lighter build. I do have plans to further reduce the weight of my setup.
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Old June 3rd, 2009, 08:32 AM   #12
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Default Latest modifications...

(if I already posted this, I apologize for double posting)

I added Ricta wheels.........I got to use them Monday night at the local park. WOW!!!!!!!!!!! Why have I not used skateboard wheels before!! Amazing difference. I never hung up on grinds and / or slides!! I'm a believer. They were lighter, faster, smoother, and easier to slide on if not landing straight. It could be my imagination, but it seemed I could jump higher as well. I've been wasting my life until I found these bad ass wheels!



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Old December 1st, 2009, 04:00 AM   #13
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nice work biff
i would replace that wood block with something a little more durable
like maby 3 pices of metal shaped in an I or maby an X
but the work looks good
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Old December 1st, 2009, 06:38 AM   #14
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I'm already thinking of my new build. I'll most likely do it within a month.
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Old May 5th, 2010, 10:04 PM   #15
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Say, biff, I'm currently looking if I can get some free used skis from somewhere, but I suddenly asked myself why.

Why do you use skis for your baseplates? What are the advantages over other things?
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Old May 6th, 2010, 02:19 AM   #16
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You could use other things like aluminum plate, but old skis are a cheaper alternative. Check the thrift and second hand stores for cheap skis.
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Old May 6th, 2010, 07:23 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by cephalopoid View Post
Say, biff, I'm currently looking if I can get some free used skis from somewhere, but I suddenly asked myself why.

Why do you use skis for your baseplates? What are the advantages over other things?

Skis are light weight, strong and sturdy, stiff yet flexible, cheap to come by at resale shops, allow adjustable mounting, and they are the right width!

A. 'Light weight' plates are always an advantage. The heavier your skate, the harder it is to be agile.

B. 'Strong and sturdy' holds up to the abuse that you will ultimately submit your aggressive skates to when skating.

C. 'Stiff yet flexible' allows your boot to flex. This makes landings less impactive on the sole of your foot by allowing your feet to absorb the shock with less instant recoil.

D. 'Cheap to come by at resale shops' means you will pay less for your skates. Do I need to explain further?

E. 'Adjustable mounting' means that you can put your trucks as far forward or rear-ward as you want. You can tailor make the plate to your own needs. I like my skate trucks as far apart as possible.

F. Being the 'right width' means that they are easily converted into skate base plates, with very little modification.


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You could use other things like aluminum plate, but old skis are a cheaper alternative. Check the thrift and second hand stores for cheap skis.

I've used aluminum plates before. In fact, before I started using skis, I used aluminum. I found that thin ones bent. So, I had to use much thicker ones, and that added bulk and weight. Skis are much better!!

The down side to skis is that you have to be extremely careful when drilling and cutting. Measure thrice......cut/drill once.
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Old May 20th, 2010, 08:29 PM   #18
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How many bolts run through your shoes? How are the shoes attached to your baseplates?


EDIT: Wait... it says riedell on your boots. Does that mean they came with holes and everything?
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Old May 20th, 2010, 09:41 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by cephalopoid View Post
How many bolts run through your shoes? How are the shoes attached to your baseplates?


EDIT: Wait... it says riedell on your boots. Does that mean they came with holes and everything?
There are 4 bolts going into my boots.

The back truck was bolted directly to the plate, and I then drilled 2 extra holes through the middle of the truck base plate and through the heel of the boot to attach it to the boot.

The front truck was bolted directly to the plate in the very front, but the 2 rear holes have bolts going through the sole of the boot as well. By not bolting the front holes through the boot, I am able to allow the natural curve of my foot to remain. Since I put my trucks ALL the way forward in the front, bolting the front holes would pull down my toe end way too much.

And no, Riedell boots do not come with pre-drilled holes, as skate plates have no standard hole pattern, and because there are many different opinions as to what is the best way to attach plates.
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