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Fitness Skating and Training Forum Discussions about on-skate and off-skate training, hydration, sports nutrition, weight loss, injuries, sports medicine, and other topics related to training and physical fitness for skaters.

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Old November 11th, 2013, 04:32 PM   #41
evilzzz
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Evilzzz, training for the London Inline Marathon next year?

My buddy who is a personal trainer and strength coach suggested I get back to lifting weights during the winter months when we are buried in snow here. I got back to my weight routine in earnest this week. It is 4 days of super sets, and when done right, really get the HR going. I have been adding cardio, usually intervals, at the end of the work out to cover that also. Last year I learned that functional strength is very important for performance. Spending 8 weeks lifting last year really helped my speed, and I have seen an increase in my average pace as well as my top speed this year. Don't discount your time in the gym. Consistency helps, also.

Unless something changes, my first marathon won't be until July 2014, though there is at least one sprint (read 10k) event in June that I plan to use as a tune-up. It is hard to stay motivated when training a lone. Keep it up, and considering posting in the Training Log.
Hey Donny,

Yes, I will definitely be looking to do LIM next year. I've only done it a couple of times which is pretty criminal considering it's right on my doorstep.

One of the things I have been very bad at is that I don't put in the winter training, so I don't have the fabled "aerobic base" when the time comes in the spring to start upping the intensity. To this end, I'm planning on really putting in the miles on a very regular basis for the next 3 months until, most of which will be just low-intensity relaxed sessions, mixed in with working on specific drills.

Keeping it low intensity is really going to be really difficult. I've always thought that if my muscles aren't burning by the end of a session then you haven't been trying hard enough, but lots of research has convinced me that it's far more beneficial to train the AEROBIC system, keeping my heart-rate firmly in the 70-75% zone. Only if you do this will your body adapt and provide you with stronger base "engine" to do most of the work. I never really appreciated that overworking the anaerobic system too much without the base is akin to wringing performance from a tiny engine.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 12:47 AM   #42
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evilzz, rule of thumb is that no more than about 25% of your training cycle should be dedicated to high intensity training, meaning intervals or fast tempo workouts. So, by all means, go out and hammer. Just don't do it every workout. You need to rest and recover between workouts, or the next one simply will not be what it should and could be, so you end up cheating yourself. BUilding the areoribc base is no cake-walk. It should be at a hard tempo, just not too hard. IT can be at a pace that you can talk, maybe just not in full sentences, and should be at least 20 minutes or more in duration. Again, it doesn't need to be low intensity, and in fact, the only low intensity you need to do is on those days you need to recover.
Donnybrook, that looks like a really good workout plan. Love the way it immediately tempers your muscles with real full-range sport stuff in conjunction with the resistance (weight) workouts. THis is exactly what i meant by most skaters i know not making weights their primary training program. You are lifting for a relatively short amount of time, and then tempering those muscles with actual use of them. I would just be careful that you are fully recovered from the previous day before you start lifting again. YOU need to supply enough time for muscles to repair themselves, if you actually start breaking them down.
As for working out outside, my personal fav is running - which i liken to the crack cocaine of exercise. It is harsh and powerful and gets the job done really quick. Get in a good run and i bet you will come away thinking, holy crap, if i could channel this intense cardio and effort into my skating, watch out! BUt the negative is, frankly, it is super easy to get very sore, very fast. ANd that's not good for your other workouts, esp. skating. Cycling is the cross-train of choice for most, but can you do that where you are in the winter?
THe honest best cross-train for you is to do what you like most. I am reading a book now that makes the point that to get to be your fastest, you need to exercise by how you feel. Ask yourself hwat will prepare you most for reaching your goal, then do it with enjoyment, and let it build your confidence. ANd do this by listening to the messages your body is sending you, adapting and adjusting the plan as you go. So, what do you like to do - ice skating sure could be great, maybe cross-country skiing, etc. For me, i just like to run as much as i can while rehabbing my injuries.
Hope this helps. THat plan looks awesome.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 02:10 PM   #43
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What about keeping warm while exercising outside during the winter? I have some UA Cold Gear, but I don't know if I would stay warm outside on a day like today when it is 17 degrees F.
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Old November 13th, 2013, 05:09 AM   #44
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What about keeping warm while exercising outside during the winter? I have some UA Cold Gear, but I don't know if I would stay warm outside on a day like today when it is 17 degrees F.
just layer up. Make sure the layers breathe, and avoid cotton, which collects moisture and gets heavy. Shed layers as you warm up and get too hot. Some good old skiing base layers available at any big box sports store work great, too.
Don't forget to hydrate adaquately. Hydrating can be deceiving in winter because you may not feel as thirsty as when it is hot outside, but you need fluids just as much.
Don't let the cold scare you from getting out. Consider the added layers as some added resistance, which only makes you faster when you won't need them anymore.
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Old November 15th, 2013, 12:00 PM   #45
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evilzz, rule of thumb is that no more than about 25% of your training cycle should be dedicated to high intensity training, meaning intervals or fast tempo workouts. So, by all means, go out and hammer. Just don't do it every workout. You need to rest and recover between workouts, or the next one simply will not be what it should and could be, so you end up cheating yourself. BUilding the areoribc base is no cake-walk. It should be at a hard tempo, just not too hard. IT can be at a pace that you can talk, maybe just not in full sentences, and should be at least 20 minutes or more in duration. Again, it doesn't need to be low intensity, and in fact, the only low intensity you need to do is on those days you need to recover.
Donnybrook, that looks like a really good workout plan. Love the way it immediately tempers your muscles with real full-range sport stuff in conjunction with the resistance (weight) workouts. THis is exactly what i meant by most skaters i know not making weights their primary training program. You are lifting for a relatively short amount of time, and then tempering those muscles with actual use of them. I would just be careful that you are fully recovered from the previous day before you start lifting again. YOU need to supply enough time for muscles to repair themselves, if you actually start breaking them down.
As for working out outside, my personal fav is running - which i liken to the crack cocaine of exercise. It is harsh and powerful and gets the job done really quick. Get in a good run and i bet you will come away thinking, holy crap, if i could channel this intense cardio and effort into my skating, watch out! BUt the negative is, frankly, it is super easy to get very sore, very fast. ANd that's not good for your other workouts, esp. skating. Cycling is the cross-train of choice for most, but can you do that where you are in the winter?
THe honest best cross-train for you is to do what you like most. I am reading a book now that makes the point that to get to be your fastest, you need to exercise by how you feel. Ask yourself hwat will prepare you most for reaching your goal, then do it with enjoyment, and let it build your confidence. ANd do this by listening to the messages your body is sending you, adapting and adjusting the plan as you go. So, what do you like to do - ice skating sure could be great, maybe cross-country skiing, etc. For me, i just like to run as much as i can while rehabbing my injuries.
Hope this helps. THat plan looks awesome.
Cheers OI,
As I will be looking to do endurance events, regarding the intensity of workouts, I'm aiming to keep it strictly around 70-75% of max heart rate for the winter, and most critically below the anerobic threshold. All the research says that by doing this you force your body to improve the efficiency of its aerobic system where the body converts stored fuel rather than drawing on the limited ATP in your muscles. Actually doing higher intensity workouts where you tap into the anerobic system is counter-productive in this regard.

I actually find it very HARD to keep a low heart rate when skating, and a short burst of speed will send my heart rate way into the higher zones, so I will need to be very strict and disciplined about keeping it steady.

Running wise, I've got a place in the next year's Berlin running marathon. I'll be doing the inline marathon too, so will be doing a "double".

I'm by no means a natural runner. I've only ever done a 10k before, once. However by committing to this race it really give me an end-goal to aim for, which I think is needed.
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Old November 16th, 2013, 12:54 AM   #46
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evilzzz, well, that's pretty cool about doing the berlin running marathon next september. as for only having done a 10k prior to this, i was the same way. Best advice is to try a mock half marathon at atleast your goal marathon pace, just for training, but don't do that within a month of the marathon (need time to recover). Most of us need a solid 5 months or more to prepare for running a marathon, even when we are already in shape, and even then, that may not be enough.
Running a marathon is so different. It is a welcome relief in many ways, as opposed to skating one. There is a very direct link between your preparation for running a marathon, and how you do. And frankly, there is just not so much need for nerves. I could go on for a long time about the differences, but at this point, just prepare well, and then executing is not so difficult.
Enjoy it!
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Old November 16th, 2013, 01:27 AM   #47
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evilzzz, well, that's pretty cool about doing the berlin running marathon next september. as for only having done a 10k prior to this, i was the same way. Best advice is to try a mock half marathon at atleast your goal marathon pace, just for training, but don't do that within a month of the marathon (need time to recover). Most of us need a solid 5 months or more to prepare for running a marathon, even when we are already in shape, and even then, that may not be enough.
Running a marathon is so different. It is a welcome relief in many ways, as opposed to skating one. There is a very direct link between your preparation for running a marathon, and how you do. And frankly, there is just not so much need for nerves. I could go on for a long time about the differences, but at this point, just prepare well, and then executing is not so difficult.
Enjoy it!
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It's one thing to roll 26 miles it's quite another to drag a carcass 26 miles.
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Old November 16th, 2013, 02:47 AM   #48
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yeah, i wasn't even quite sure that you were considering doing a double. Which one would come first?
That's not something i would even remotely want to do, but that's just me.
For me, i would approach it from the angle of wanting to achieve some kind of time that would give me a little pride. And i would want that it either of the events. If, on the other hand, you are striving for some kind of endurance milestone, i think there's more formidable ones in either of a 100k skate or an ultra-marathon run.
I can tell you that finishing a running marathon at even a moderate pace maintained for that long is a major accomplishment.
If i were to ever do a double, it would be a half marathon run and maybe a half marathon skate. Then there is some chance of maintaining some degree of quality for most of it. Otherwise, i am afraid, it's more an exercise strictly in enduring pain for the sake of proving that you can endure pain.
But hey, i suppose i would feel the same about an ironman, and while this is not something i would do, plenty of people do. So, okay, in that light, well....
But i guess from my viewpoint, a 26 mile run can be a magnificient thing. Like ursle said, best to get that one achieved first, before you change the fundamental meaning of it with the long skate.
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Old November 29th, 2013, 06:06 PM   #49
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Cheers for the encouragement!

I think I should be "fine" doing the running marathon. I've been paying attention to my eating routine and doing regular jogging for about a month now- have shed about 6lbs and I feel that I'm already in much better running shape. I don't have any major time goals, and could probably comfortably jog around in 5 - 5.5hrs even if it was held next month. However, I know sub-4hrs would probably require quite a lot more training than I'm willing to invest into it.

You know what else? I've practically given up on "performance goals", nowadays my main goal is to enjoy what I do. I'm not competing with anyone other than myself. There's always going to be someone faster, stronger, and better. That's just the reality for most of us. I'll still do it to the best of my ability but I'm not going to beat myself up if I can't shave those extra few minutes from my marathon time. I want it to be a challenge and to have a sense of accomplishment, but I'm far more interested in enjoying the path I take in getting there.
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Old November 30th, 2013, 05:30 AM   #50
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evilzz, the great thing about the marathon is that, yes, just going the distance is an accomplishment in itself. Admire your attitude, and i think it will get you a long ways. My only advice is to start at a reasonable pace, get comfortable and get a good portion of the course behind you before you even think of pushing the pace. Good for you if you find you can, but if you are going to run into trouble, expending too much energy early on will absolutely kill you later.
And don't underestimate how important it is to have a plan about hydration strategy, re-fueling, carbing up before hand, etc.
Have a good one, and let us know how it goes.
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