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Quad Vert All kinds of aggressive skating on quad roller skates including quad vertical roller skating, quad bowl skating, quad skatepark tricks, and street skating tricks in quad skates.

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Old August 14th, 2013, 08:10 AM   #1
biffsk8er
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Default New skates almost complete




The straight red lines show a groove running from end to end (toe to heel) for sliding on coping, rails, or ledges in a 50/50 style. The hourglass red lines depict a deeper groove shaped so as to allow the backside/frontside grinds to lock in, yet not bind while going around curved rails or coping. Also, you can see that only two bolts hold the entire slider assembly together to the plate. I used furniture bolts.



Here, you can see the toe to heel groove. Additionally, you can see the 4 layers of the slide plate assembly, as seen from the toe of the plate.



Here is a side view of the plate (toe end to the left/heel end to the right). You can also see the H-block lock in spot under the slider and the mounting areas for the trucks on either end.



The slider plates have been drilled in order to lighten the weight of the skates. It also lowers the amount of friction when doing grinds...less material to grab.



This is the top of the mounting plate (a cut piece of snow ski). Here you can see where the furniture bolts attach to the 4 prong T-Nut.

The reason to use a ski for a vert skate plate is three-fold :
* It keeps the weight down.
* It is flexible, and springs back to retain its' shape.
* It is nearly indestructible.



These are the type of nuts used for my plates. They sink in flush to the plate with teeth that prevent them from spinning. Once the boots are mounted on the plates, the low profile nuts will not be felt through the boots.
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Old August 19th, 2013, 11:03 AM   #2
Lil Rev
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Does that mean we'll get some new videos.... Can't wait!!

What boot are you using this time, or are you sticking with the Riedell? Now I've built my own 'speed skate' quad, I'd consider doing something similar to what you're building there for grinds/vert. It all seems to make a little more sense now I've done one (albeit quite different), and doesn't seem so daunting...
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Old August 21st, 2013, 01:34 AM   #3
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I was trying a hiking boot, but the rubber soul is turning out to be too soft. Not responsive enough. Comfortable, though. I'm thinking of switching to something with a harder soul. Here are pics :







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Old August 21st, 2013, 02:24 AM   #4
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You just need to Shoe Goo bond a 5/32" DragonPlate carbon fiber laminate sheet to the sole of these boots and your problem is solved!

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Old August 21st, 2013, 04:01 AM   #5
RS Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biffsk8er View Post
I was trying a hiking boot, but the rubber soul is turning out to be too soft. Not responsive enough. Comfortable, though. I'm thinking of switching to something with a harder soul. Here are pics :







You could make an extra insole out of thin sheet metal. Drill the bolt mounting holes through it so the boot sole is sandwiched between the sheet metal and the baseplate. Put the regular insoles on top of the sheet metal ones when done.
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Old August 21st, 2013, 06:12 AM   #6
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You could make an extra insole out of thin sheet metal. Drill the bolt mounting holes through it so the boot sole is sandwiched between the sheet metal and the baseplate. Put the regular insoles on top of the sheet metal ones when done.
This can also work, but it helps if you feet are of the rather flat variety, your insoles are exceptionally well contoured & structured, or some of each.

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