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Fitness Skating and Training Forum Discussions about on-skate and off-skate training, hydration, sports nutrition, weight loss, injuries, sports medicine, and other topics related to training and physical fitness for skaters.

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Old October 22nd, 2010, 05:02 AM   #1
goldleader
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Default developing sustainable power

I am relatively new to the sport, about 7 months on inlines.My fastest lap in the 100 meter indoor is 10.1 seconds, but I can only maintain this pace for a few laps before my legs burn so bad that they just weaken significantly and my lap times slow.My question is what type of workout can i do to increase speed and the length of time that I can excert that amount of power so I can turn more laps at a faster pace.In other words how can I go faster for a longer period of time so I can be competitive.Diet and workout tips would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks for helping.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 05:18 AM   #2
slowsk8
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How old are you? 10 sec laps after only 7 months you are ready for the big time.
lots of squats, anything to make your legs stronger, and when they start to hurt try to push through it. They might be a bit sore the next day, this can be a good thing, they are getting stronger. Hurts to much? give them a day of rest and go again. It wont happen over night but it will happen.
Just don't over do it and hurt your self
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 02:08 PM   #3
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I am 41 years old,6'2" about 180 pounds.I workout about 3 to 5 days a week.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 02:23 PM   #4
Bill in Houston
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Skate outdoors for an hour or two one day a week.

Indoors, when you stand up to coast, you coast for a lap or two. "Recovering", just pushing a little, you can keep a good speed for 3 or 4 laps while you take it easy. Outdoors, if you take it easy, you stop. You will learn how to get up to the edge of leg-burning and stay there. You also learn to skate hard even when your legs are already feeling jello-ish.

As far as eating, just make good choices. Get some protein and carbs soon after you skate.

If you want to do something besides skating, consider a spin class. The classes are usually very much focused on getting up to your limit, going a little beyond, getting back down to the limit, going way past the limit, getting back down, repeated about 15 times. Helps make you stronger, helps your body learn to deliver more oxygen to your legs, and teaches you to maintain form and effort even when you are past the limit.

If you are a gadget guy, get a heart rate monitor and see what kind of heart rate you are getting up to.

Sounds like you are doing great. Keep up the good work.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 02:46 PM   #5
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Thanks for the info.I am going to incorporate the 2 hour outdoor skate 1 day a week at first the maybe up it later as I progress.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 04:13 PM   #6
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Reading your post, I deduce that you want to increase your speed endurance for indoor skating. Anything other than indoor skating would be considered cross training. Cross training for this is only beneficial if you are doing a lot of primary training which as I said would be more indoor skating. First of all, it's going to take a little time, but as anyone can guess, the quickest way to accomplish this would be high speed intervals indoors. When we are working on our speed endurance there are a couple versions of the same thing that we do to work on this.

One is the "pyramid of pain" where you alternate between recovery laps on the outside track and sprint laps on the regular track. You start with 3 laps outside track (outer perimeter of floor), then move to the regular track for a full sprint for 1 lap. Back to the outside track for 3 laps before starting the next interval. Of the three laps on the outside track, the first is full recovery coasting with some easy stroking. This is also when anyone that got dropped catches back up to the pack. Lap 2 we start stroking again at a moderate pace, lap three we pick it up and then sprint out of the final turn into the sprint lap(s). Each time we sprint (each of the intervals), we add a lap up to 7. So it's 3 outside/1 inside, 3 outside/2 inside, 3 outside/3 inside and so on up to 7 on the inside and then back down the other side of the pyramid ending with the one lap sprint. That's 49 sprint laps.

Another thing we do is the same thing basic thing except we just alternate 3 outside laps with 2 sprint laps. This one is clearly a little easier and is more focused on the pure sprint aspect and is typically done for several practices before moving up to the pyramid of pain.

If you want to keep it all on the regular track, an option is to do "3-2-1". You take three fast laps, 2 faster laps and one pure all out sprint. Repeating this 6-7 times is tough a tough one as well.

One of the keys to keeping this interesting is to mix up the order of the skaters and factoring in passes. Timing the application of the type of drill is also critical. Launching into the pyramid of pain out of the gate too early in the season can be counterproductive. I believe in developing the speed before the speed endurance. We will start with the "3/2 alternate" several times before we move up to the pyramid of pain later in the season.

All of these interval options assumes that you have some sort of a moderate base. I'd strongly advise focusing entirely on circle drills, dryland and plyometrics for several weeks to get a strength and stability base that will allow you to maintain good indoor form when you start to strain during these intervals.

Last edited by speedysktr; October 22nd, 2010 at 04:54 PM. Reason: rewrote for clarity
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 05:16 PM   #7
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At 41 you skate grand master. The national record for 5 laps is 46.704. I think that works out to about 9.34 per lap. At 10.1 you need to take less then 1 sec off each lap to break the record. It's a long time till nationals.
I take back what I said before, you tell me how to train.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 05:24 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowsk8 View Post
How old are you? 10 sec laps after only 7 months you are ready for the big time.
Big Time? No, not really. At nationals, a 10.1 maintained for 10 laps MAY keep you from being lapped in the 1000M, barely.
But, after just 7 months, I would say you are doing a great job.

Maintaining high speed laps requires the strength you are building, and more importantly, good technique. Without good form, you won't be able to maintain the lap times, regardless of how strong you are.

At 6'2, 180lbs doesn't sound overly heavy, and unless you know you have a high body fat percentage, I wouldn't worry about the weight. Training and a decent diet (proper nutrition, not lack of food for weight loss) will take care of that.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 05:30 PM   #9
goldleader
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That pyramid sounds great!The challenge is motivating and I can't wait to bring this valuable info to our speed practice and run it by our coach to incorporate into our session.I think at first the 3/2 sounds good to get me familiar with the excercise but I see moving into the interval with increasing numbers quickly and look forward to the challenge.Thankyou so much for this info and if anybody else has any more I will surely like to hear your opinion, everyones info is a psoitive step for me.many thanks.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 05:45 PM   #10
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goldleader,

Though I only skate quads for speed, and I do most of my skating MILES outdoors, I do know a lot about training concepts.

If I can offer you one major tip, it is that you do not base all your outdoor skate training on just the # of miles rolled, but instead base it on a skate speed-interval approach. By this I mean that for every outdoor workout you do, you ONLY skate over measured courses where the specific distances from point to point are known and can be pace monitored.

You then structure your workouts so that you spend targeted periods of time rolling at different, and well measured, levels of speed.
It is critical to roll for at least ~10-20% of your miles at a speed equal to or, preferably somewhat faster the the pace you ultimately want to sustain indoors. Initially, you will skate during these unsustainable higher speed-interval portions of your workouts for limited but steadily increasing & targeted lengths of time, before backing off to your sustainable workout speed. Over time, as you ratchet up both the % of your workout time, and the levels of higher speed targeted to spend during those portions of workout done at the higher unsustainable pace , you will see some rapid rates of improvement in your sustainable speed as well, and thus a likely boost toward reaching your indoor speed goals too.
I have found this this approach has been most effective for producing a rapid performance improvement in minimum time in three sports -- as a distance runner, as a bicycle racer, and now as a long distance quad speed skater. All the Best.

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Old October 22nd, 2010, 11:35 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jshipman View Post
Big Time? No, not really. At nationals, a 10.1 maintained for 10 laps MAY keep you from being lapped in the 1000M, barely.
But, after just 7 months, I would say you are doing a great job.

Maintaining high speed laps requires the strength you are building, and more importantly, good technique. Without good form, you won't be able to maintain the lap times, regardless of how strong you are.

At 6'2, 180lbs doesn't sound overly heavy, and unless you know you have a high body fat percentage, I wouldn't worry about the weight. Training and a decent diet (proper nutrition, not lack of food for weight loss) will take care of that.
Jship, check the records for Grand master, or do you have newer records?
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