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Fitness Skating and Training Forum Discussions about on-skate and off-skate training, hydration, sports nutrition, weight loss, injuries, sports medicine, and other topics related to training and physical fitness for skaters.

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Old August 29th, 2010, 09:04 PM   #21
PBLsQuad450
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Hmmm, I believe there are no actual yams in North America. Maybe in South America, definitely in Africa. We have sweet potatoes as mentioned above, about a zillion variations, like apples. They are a wonderful food. Raw foods however are no great idea. Destroy some nutrients, yep. But also makes new ones and changes others. Cooking and prepping our food, like turning corn into a tortilla is akin to predigesting. It allows our bodies to maximize the nutritional value of quick access protein and fats. I know, we have taken the idea too far in many ways, but it is a critical point in human evolution. 2.5 million years ago or so. Using up our calories to digest dumb old barks, raw everything and even rotting meats didn't allow our brains to develop optimally. Using that big 'ol melon on your shoulders is actually intensive in terms of needing high quality calories. It makes us smarter as a species (over generations, not in the short term as far as I know).

Cooking on the embers probably makes more carbon emissions than starting your car and cooking on your exhaust manifold. Your car has a catalytic converter, your campfire doesn't.

I used to be wrought with guilt every time I started up one of my 2 stroke engines. Burning oil and gas is not good, no not ever. Then I watched BP put about 100,000 barrels of crude a day in the Gulf. I couldn't agree more with sustainability practice, mind you. I'm just beginning to think what we do is useless in light of what can happen in the blink of an eye in industrial production or oil addiction.
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Old August 29th, 2010, 09:17 PM   #22
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Looked at the store today. Out of all the roots that had bark, none were yams. There was Yucca and Taro, for goodness sake. I'll have to look at a different store.

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Cooking on the embers probably makes more carbon emissions than starting your car and cooking on your exhaust manifold. Your car has a catalytic converter, your campfire doesn't.
+1

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Old August 30th, 2010, 03:11 AM   #23
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From what I remember, yams are seasonal and they came in like crazy during the winter months this past year.
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Old August 30th, 2010, 03:33 AM   #24
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From what I remember, yams are seasonal and they came in like crazy during the winter months this past year.
ah, thanks. i'll try to remember to look for them.
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Old August 30th, 2010, 05:02 AM   #25
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a little research solves the yams/sweet potato mystery.

Yes, Yams are actually not grown in the U.S., but mainly in the carribean and are a course skinned root, with more of a yellow or white inner, as opposed to Sweet Potatoes that are smooth skinned. What are sold in the U.S. are not true yams, but are in fact sweet potatoes. A few decades ago, a sweet potato with a softer flesh (or inner) was introduced to the south, so growers refered to these new sweet potatoes by the African name 'Yams' to distinguish them from the conventional sweet potatoes, though they were not Yams at all.

To find true yams, you need to look in an international market. THE USDA requires that conventional sweet potatoes yams also contain the name sweet potato along with the name yams.

Here's an article that explains it a little better than i can http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/myster...eetpotato.html
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Old August 30th, 2010, 12:11 PM   #26
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that one pretty much says the opposite of the other article as far as color, sweetness, etc. i'll just look for one called "yams" with no "sweet potato" involved.
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Old August 30th, 2010, 01:48 PM   #27
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Well, I'll be yamed! But for now, Jethro and me's still eatin' Sweet "Taters! Didn't mean to pirate the thread. Just offering a nutrition tip that works for me. Now that we're all "plum' full" of it (?), ...

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Old October 6th, 2010, 06:54 PM   #28
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I always feel my energy sustained longer when I have avocado & cheese on flax/seeded grain bread. Not too much volume of food though, as too much protein before workout can also make you feel sluggish. So, for breakfast, pre-work out, I have maybe 1/2 slice of bread with < 1 oz cheese & < 1/4 of an avocado on top.

For pre-rehydration either coconut water (contains natural electrolytes) or vitamin water (zero) - prefer something with B & C vits. While working out I use just water.

I've read some interesting stuff on not too overload on high carb foods and sugary stuff: bagels, orange juice, fruits, bars - most every energy bar falls into that category.

Dratz, you mean to tell the yams I've been eating all along are not really yams? sigh...guess I'm okay with it, go by color & flavor and organic.

If you're battling choices of food-prep re-think cookin' in the microwave - sure it's convenient, but it's also harmful.
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Old October 26th, 2010, 09:07 PM   #29
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Night session:turkey ham sandwich with some low fat cheese and a bottle of water.

Morning session: two eggs (Redi eggs) one squash, handfull of spinach, some mushrooms and chayote.

Either way I eat an apple and a low fat cheese stick after.

It occurs to me we might be skating differently, I only skate inside at sessions, or club time, but if I don't eat I shake and do not have a good session.
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Old October 29th, 2010, 09:57 PM   #30
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Not sure if this fits here but... I did P90X last year and got totally hooked on their recovery drink. I actually drink it when I skate and I honestly feel like I perform better and have more stamina. I have no idea how it compares to other sports drinks but I swear by it. I try to eat a little light prior to a workout (toast w/ peanut butter or a banana) because I hate getting stomach cramps out on the trails...
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Old October 29th, 2010, 11:19 PM   #31
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oatmeal with honey

yoghurt with granola

coffee
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Old November 20th, 2010, 04:09 PM   #32
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Default Eddie says:

And when Eddie speaks, everyone listens....LOL

Eddie Matzger recommended Sweet Potatoes in his skating up and then down the Highest paved road in the world YouTube video. In one of the series of 4-5 vids it took him to complete the trek. Eat something, though, if you bonk it's too easy to crash land....
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Old November 20th, 2010, 07:09 PM   #33
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Quote:
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...Eddie Matzger recommended Sweet Potatoes in his skating up and then down the Highest paved road in the world YouTube video. ... Eat something, though, if you bonk it's too easy to crash land....
Agreed, about the bonk prevention measures.
Job Number One: Don't Bonk and Don't Dehydrate.
Great to focus on optimizing energy output, but those two will just shut you down faster than you'd like, and with potentially serious medical consequences.
So, my ounce of prevention consists of always carrying a pack of energy gel in my skate jersye pocket every time i go out. I just never know when i might bonk, and having done it once, it is very very unpleasant. As for dehydration, there's generally enough fountains around my trail, and i don't seem to have as much of an issue with that, anyway, and i kind of know that if i;m going to be out for over an hour, i know to get water where i can (or bring some with if it's realy hot and i know i;m going on a long one).

As for sweet potatoes, i have to wonder about that a little, while good in and of itself, i still hold to the more common nutritional advice to mix two different food groups for optimal benefit. A guy at work who has had nutritional counseling as a result of serious heart blockage issues had his nutritionist tell him to make sure he gets a little high quality protein with each snack, which makes me think of how protein is always mixed in with carbs for energy gels/bars. Seems like sweet potatoes alone would just burn up quick like kindling, while protein would give more of a slow release.
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Old November 21st, 2010, 03:39 AM   #34
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The brilliance is in the timing of the starch release. Simple sugars are absorbed very quickly and get thrown into glycogen and fat storage depots about as quickly as it's eaten. Glycogen (aside from just sugar) is the fastest source of energy and depletes pretty quickly, so when you need fats to get energy, the energy flow is about the slowest way of getting energy from the body. Starches require time to break down with digestion before being absorbed in a much more manageable rate, allowing the body to use it as a longer-term fuel source. I also think sweet potato starches break down slower than the white potatoes, but I'm not 100% sure, though it seems to be a better food for glycemic control. Proteins also work in a similar manner, but are also great for recovery afterwards.

I've personally found yams and eggs to be great energy sources throughout the day, and not necessarily just for working out.

And sweet potato season is upon us (with Thanksgiving and all). Have yet to see them in stores in this area of the country, though
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 02:02 AM   #35
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Indeed, sweet potato season is upon us, though I'm guessing it's just the beginning, and we're only at a relative trickle. Scored myself some 7 pounds of the stuff today. 49 cents per pound for about half of them (one variety), 99 cents per pound for the other half of the batch (of various varieties). Great smells are coming out of the oven as I type this
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Old January 30th, 2011, 02:49 PM   #36
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Default Don't eat the whole thing in one sitting....



JK!
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Old January 30th, 2011, 02:51 PM   #37
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Quote:
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JK!
my kids eat that with everything
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Old January 30th, 2011, 06:19 PM   #38
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Quote:
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Sugar Load, and contains Saturated Fats in the form of the Palm Oil.

Go ahead and eat it (j/k).

Last edited by online inline; January 30th, 2011 at 07:20 PM.
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Old January 31st, 2011, 12:14 AM   #39
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Quote:
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Sugar Load, and contains Saturated Fats in the form of the Palm Oil.

Go ahead and eat it (j/k).
Instead of thinking of it as super-tasty peanut butter, it's better to think of it as chocolate pudding with a few nutrients.
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Old January 31st, 2011, 01:52 AM   #40
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Correct me if I am wrong, but peanuts are vegetables, like peas, not nuts like walnuts, so the protein is incomplete. Eaten with a whole protein you realize the protein in it, like with a glass of milk. I generally don't eat it, even the natural kinds. Cashew butter or almond butter are good (OK, technically neither are a true nut but both are complete proteins). Now, what you can get and what is OK to eat in Kabul is a different world. And I see the JK, but I see kids on campus with giant tubs of peanut butter and large graduated jugs of water...
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