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Outdoor Quads Discussions about outdoor quad skates and any discussion relatd to skating on quad roller skatse outdoors.

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Old August 7th, 2014, 06:13 AM   #21
Mort
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Expansion joints suck for quads! Ugh. Any straight line crack a quad runs straight into is terrible on it. The wider the wheel the worse it is. Taller and more narrow wheels help. With thicker urethane and a bit softer compound. - like a quad wheel tried to imitate an inline wheel.

If your just into the smooth areas right now then a lighter thinner wheel uch as helium/ hydrogen from roll line would be good. Heck if you know derby players maybe they have some "hybrid" wheels for sale on the cheap.

78-84A and a more narrow wheel like 28-32 mm. If you end up going on the rough stuff asphalt it might chew thinner urethane up. All those loose gravels are havoc on wheels.
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Old August 7th, 2014, 08:54 AM   #22
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Default Zombie Hawgs 76mm 86a

I only skate outdoors - streets, sidewalks, parking lots, bike trails, hockey rinks and skate parks. I recommend Zombie Hawgs 76mm 86a (turquoise color). I have them on Avenger magnesium plates and I have plenty of clearance. I am 6’, 175 lbs. They are sold as longboard/freeride skateboard wheels in sets of four, so you will need to buy two sets. Price is about $84 for eight wheels. The large wheel diameter smooths out cracks and debris much better than smaller wheels and the hardness is good for speed without losing grip or excessive vibration. I wish they were available in harder, 90a. They also have a fairly large weight-saving hub. Only problem is they are wide, which is unnecessary weight. I use a hacksaw, electric drill, cone cushion, bolt and dish soap to remove 10mm from the outside of each wheel. This reduces the contact patch to around 30mm and drops some weight. The mod takes time, but the result is a great outdoor wheel.

Last edited by BigFoot; August 7th, 2014 at 05:11 PM.
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Old August 10th, 2014, 03:00 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigFoot View Post
I only skate outdoors - streets, sidewalks, parking lots, bike trails, hockey rinks and skate parks. I recommend Zombie Hawgs 76mm 86a (turquoise color). I have them on Avenger magnesium plates and I have plenty of clearance. I am 6’, 175 lbs. They are sold as longboard/freeride skateboard wheels in sets of four, so you will need to buy two sets. Price is about $84 for eight wheels. The large wheel diameter smooths out cracks and debris much better than smaller wheels and the hardness is good for speed without losing grip or excessive vibration. I wish they were available in harder, 90a. They also have a fairly large weight-saving hub. Only problem is they are wide, which is unnecessary weight. I use a hacksaw, electric drill, cone cushion, bolt and dish soap to remove 10mm from the outside of each wheel. This reduces the contact patch to around 30mm and drops some weight. The mod takes time, but the result is a great outdoor wheel.
Bigfoot, how much better do you think these Z-Hawg wheels perform than any other outdoor wheel you have rolled?

BTW, if you narrow the Z-Hawgs by removing the outside urethane that protrudes past the hub, do not just leave a sharp corner there. It needs to have a 45º chamfer, or even better, a radius made at the corner of the cut.

Without a radius or chamfer made there after the cut, the urethane will more easily split and chunk out there. I have already seen a little bit of this from making a radius that was too small. I suggest .050" minimum radius.
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Old August 11th, 2014, 01:41 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort View Post
Expansion joints suck for quads! Ugh. Any straight line crack a quad runs straight into is terrible on it. The wider the wheel the worse it is. Taller and more narrow wheels help. With thicker urethane and a bit softer compound. - like a quad wheel tried to imitate an inline wheel.
...
Agreed!! And just how much extra would it cost if the construction spec for all urban concrete pours stated that ALL CONCRETE EXPANSION JOINTS & GROOVES MUST BE ALIGNED AT 60º AWAY FROM PRIMARY DIRECTION OF FLOW (not 90º).

I am on a mission to have Chicago pass a City Ordinance with just this concern addressed. When I hear those mini-wheeled skateboarders rolling the sidewalks near me I really cringe from how loud the noise is, but at least they have the longer wheelbase to better contend with the problem.

-Armadillo
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Old August 11th, 2014, 03:53 PM   #25
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Agreed!! And just how much extra would it cost if the construction spec for all urban concrete pours stated that ALL CONCRETE EXPANSION JOINTS & GROOVES MUST BE ALIGNED AT 60º AWAY FROM PRIMARY DIRECTION OF FLOW (not 90º).

I am on a mission to have Chicago pass a City Ordinance with just this concern addressed. When I hear those mini-wheeled skateboarders rolling the sidewalks near me I really cringe from how loud the noise is, but at least they have the longer wheelbase to better contend with the problem.

-Armadillo
Ha! An extra swipe with a hand trial! But thats FAR TOO HARD! lol.
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Old August 11th, 2014, 04:02 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armadillo View Post
Agreed!! And just how much extra would it cost if the construction spec for all urban concrete pours stated that ALL CONCRETE EXPANSION JOINTS & GROOVES MUST BE ALIGNED AT 60º AWAY FROM PRIMARY DIRECTION OF FLOW (not 90º).

I am on a mission to have Chicago pass a City Ordinance with just this concern addressed. When I hear those mini-wheeled skateboarders rolling the sidewalks near me I really cringe from how loud the noise is, but at least they have the longer wheelbase to better contend with the problem.

-Armadillo
Average skateboard wheels have shrunk since the late eighties wen I still knew what was up. The new stuff is way more agile but also part of why longboards have become such a thing. There are cracks in the road in front of my house I barely notice on my skates but one of the skateboarders that comes through here has to do an obvious little almost ollie to cross them.
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Old August 14th, 2014, 08:11 AM   #27
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Default Z-Hawgs

Armadillo - You are right; you may want to round off the edge after cutting down a wheel. A freshly-cut edge can grab the surface and twist in or out, or oscillate as you try to ride on the point. This is especially true when doing crossover turns. Use sandpaper and an electric drill, and wear a dust mask. Urethane dust is thought to be a human carcinogen. I haven’t seen any cupping or splitting of the edge, but it makes sense that it can. As an alternative to sanding the edge, you can mount the wheels and do several power slides. The softer 78a wheels rounded up a lot faster than the 86a Z-Hawgs, of course. It took me 20 or more power slides to round the edge of the Z-Hawgs. They are slow to wear down.

As far as comparing the Z-Hawgs performance to other wheels I have used…

Krypto Roadrunner - I bought several sets of these old school outdoor wheels before they were discontinued. They kept me rolling for years. They were approximately 68mm high and 32mm wide with a 35mm hub. Hardness was 78a. Their softness made them momentum killers, but they were grippy and were a smooth ride on rough surfaces. They had a decent sized hub and a good wheel width. It was nice that they were off-the-shelf ready to mount.

Kryptonics Route 70 - 70mm tall and almost 45mm wide with a 25mm hub. Hardness is 78a. Hub is encased in urethane, so it is basically solid urethane from the bearing housing to the edge of the wheel. They are heavy. I cut them down to 32mm, which helped to drop some weight. This wheel is another momentum killer, but gives a quiet, buttery smooth ride, even on mediocre asphalt. Good for roller dancing. Too soft and heavy for speed skating or long skate sessions.

Zuumo Supreme – 72mm tall and 35mm wide with a 38mm hub. Hardness is 78a. This was an eBay purchase of a Chinese import. A good outdoor wheel. Taller wheel = surface leveler. Big, lightweight hub and narrow width. Although it has a hardness of 78a, it feels faster than the Roadrunners and Route 70s, maybe because of the larger wheel diameter.

The Z-Hawgs are harder, taller and (after trimming) lighter than these wheels. You get more distance per push. I think the large wheel diameter give you a slightly better “rolling” or “gliding” feeling than the smaller wheels, too. I was worried that the hardness would make them too slippery and cause them to lose traction on smooth concrete, but this didn’t happen. They have excellent grip on smooth surfaces. In fact, I would like them to be more “slidey.” Again, I would like to try a Z-Hawg in a 90a.
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Old August 19th, 2014, 02:27 PM   #28
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Default Orangatang Moronga 86a yellow

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigFoot View Post
Again, I would like to try a Z-Hawg in a 90a.
But they are not available!

I also use for training the Z-Hawgs since years, but for speed or longer races (we do from 42 km up to 135 km a day) these are a way to soft.

Best for this are the Orangatang Balut (which is already discontinued and not more available) which I used in a few marathon races with best times everywhere.

Now yedaki.de and me tried the successor, the 86a Orangatang Moronga which is unfortunatly a bit heavier, but same fantastic PU like the Balut and center-cored which gives space to make them more slim.
We cutted them on a lathe on the inside up to the bearing box and tested them last weekend for about 90 km.

Really, really fast and grippy as well, also on wet roads what we had enough on that weekend. :-(

In my eyes the best overall speed wheel available at present which works also on really rough roads where the RD Twister sucks.

For all who are still in search for the best, give them a try!

Cheers

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Old August 19th, 2014, 07:22 PM   #29
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No doubt the Orangutang Balut & Moronga have a good PU formula, and their centered hub allows for further narrowing, but IMO the larger spoked hub of the 76mm Z-Hawgs gives them the advantage for bigger size at a similar weight for improved rough asphalt roll.

the 72.5 mm Orangutang size better matches certain plates with less deck height, but if your plate can handle 76mm, by all means try the 84A or the 86A Z-Hawgs, if you can find a way to have them narrowed.

I will soon (in Sept.) be offering this wheel narrowing service and selling Z-Hawgs too.

76mm Z-Hawgs are available in 78A to 86A firmness Blue (78A), White (80A), Yellow (82A), new Orange -OR- old Teal w/Blk hub (84A), new Teal w/purple hub 86A

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