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Outdoor Quads Discussions about outdoor quad skates and any discussion relatd to skating on quad roller skatse outdoors.

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Old November 3rd, 2014, 12:52 PM   #1
Eleone
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Default Uneven wearing of one wheel

I'm not sure if this should go here or in the Beginners forum, but...

I've been skating outside with a cheap pair of skates (artistic boots) and 82A wheels for about two months. I'd never skated before, and I'm learning on my own, so there's a possibility I'm doing something wrong. I've noticed that one wheel is much smaller than the others (about 2 mm smaller). It's the left front wheel on my right skate (my dominant foot). Is this normal? Since I've noticed that, I've been paying attention to the way I skate and I do tend to push a bit stronger with that wheel, is this wrong? Should I try to correct this and push evenly with the whole skate? The left skate is perfect, I haven't noticed any difference in the wear of the wheels.

I think it could also be because I've been practising T-stops quite frequently, and at first I tended to drag that wheel before I learnt to press the skate properly on the floor.

The thing is, I'm getting a new better pair of skates and I don't want this to happen again... How often should I rotate the wheels? I skate about 5 hours per week (if it's not raining...) And how often should I replace the wheels? I read in an older thread that some people change their wheels if there's a 3 mm wear, but I don't think I can afford it...

Also, what is the best way to stop (wheels-wise) for a beginner? I'd like my wheels to last for as long as possible... The snow plow stop? I can't do a tomahawk stop yet. (I've seen the poll in this forum and it seems everyone has a preferred way of stopping, but I have to ask anyway )

Thank you in advance, and sorry for the rookie questions
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Old November 3rd, 2014, 02:47 PM   #2
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I would venture to guess that every skater in the world has a somewhat different wear pattern. And that pattern will change as you learn new stuff. But I wouldn't call it wrong. T-stops will hasten that wear too. Outdoors will wear them diwn as well. Good news is wheels can be rotated to even wear. If it's really bad you can spin stop instead.
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Old November 3rd, 2014, 02:58 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleone View Post
It's the left front wheel on my right skate (my dominant foot). Is this normal?
It's not abnormal. You are probably pushing a bit more backwards than experienced skaters, and you tend to push of your toes when you do that. If you squat a bit more and get your weight back on your heels somewhat you can have longer strides with the weight distributed across all the wheels. That's a more efficient way of skating. As long as you aren't trying to get max speed there isn't anything "wrong" with the way you skate per se, although you might be more prone to falling forward and potentially hitting your head if your weight distribution is as bad as some skaters I have seen.

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Originally Posted by Eleone View Post
The thing is, I'm getting a new better pair of skates and I don't want this to happen again... How often should I rotate the wheels?
If you don't rotate your wheels it will happen again. How often you rotate has a lot to do with skater weight, skating style, and skating surface, so it's hard to say as an outsider. It also has a lot to do with the wheel material. Cheaper wheels wear faster. Softer wheels wear faster. So maybe this won't be as big a deal with the higher quality wheels automatically. Just keep an eye on it. As far as when to replace the wheels, it depends on the amount of urethane around the hub originally and how the urethane wears versus cracks or starts to crumble.

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Also, what is the best way to stop (wheels-wise) for a beginner?
If you're only worried about wheel life the best stop would be falling or crashing into something. Next up would be dragging the toe stops (or turning around and going up on them). The real suggestion is to use a stepping plow stop. Any stop which uses dragging the wheels is going to wear them out. If instead you turn the toes in, then step while bending the knees you absorb the energy with your knees and hips instead. It will take several steps to stop from any sort of reasonable speed, but not necessarily all that much distance if you turn the toes in enough and do quick steps that don't roll anywhere.
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Old November 3rd, 2014, 05:20 PM   #4
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Thank you for your answers and your advice, Derrick and WJCIV, it was very helpful

I'm not going fast at the moment, I skate in a basketball court so I don't have much room to skate very fast. I'll try squatting a bit more and distributing my weight better.

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If you're only worried about wheel life the best stop would be falling or crashing into something.
That's what I did when I first started to skate
And... what I do now when something unexpected happens (like a small dog running towards me forcing me to crash into a fence to avoid running over it)

I haven't even heard of stepping plow stops before, I should "study" more . So I should take quick steps instead of just dragging the wheels, right? Should I keep my legs wide apart to do this? Thank you again
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Old November 3rd, 2014, 08:35 PM   #5
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I haven't even heard of stepping plow stops before, I should "study" more . So I should take quick steps instead of just dragging the wheels, right? Should I keep my legs wide apart to do this? Thank you again
That's probably because there's another name for it - I don't know all the terms they teach beginner skaters. This video just calls it a stepping stop, but I like to differentiate between the plow style (toes turned in) and the sideways style (turned sideways like a hockey stop). This example is on inlines, but it's basically the same on quads, although I do find it a little harder.
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Old November 4th, 2014, 10:04 PM   #6
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Thank you for the video . The stop does look a bit difficult, but I'll practise it. I have to practise the spin stop Derrick suggested too.
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Old November 5th, 2014, 06:24 AM   #7
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Realize this - you only push laterally AGAINST your down & rolling, plus inward carving, skate.

What you are actually pushing is YOUR BODY'S MASS INWARD, laterally away, at ~90 degrees, from the rolling skate

To most effectively gain momentum, once you are rolling, your push against the down & rolling skate needs to be very near to 90 degrees to the the rolling path of the skate, and you need to be keeping all of its four wheels down right up until the end of the push.

The best way to keep all four wheels down is to drive the leg's push force more onto the heel and rear axle, not so much onto the forefoot and front axle.

Outdoors. if you push diagonally rearward, and also do an end of push toe flick (raising your heel), this is what concentrates too much load on the left front wheel of right skate -OR- right front wheel of left foot. This results in more lateral dragging of these wheels across the rolling surface, causing accelerated wear. Only when you slow down a lot, like going uphill and/or into a strong wind, does ypor push need to be directed more diagonally rearward.

By directing your push force more down onto your heels and the rear axle wheels as you finish the pushes, the wheels will all stay down and thus wear more equally.

You should also notice greater speed as you push more in the 90 degree direction while keeping more weight and push force concentrated on the rear wheels. Staying low also allows the push extension to move your body further laterally away from the down skate, which maximizes acceleration.

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Old November 5th, 2014, 03:24 PM   #8
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The stop isn't that difficult if you slow it down. The demonstrator there was trying to show how powerful the stop is, but you can take slower, longer steps and take a longer time to stop.

What sort of skating are you trying to do? Armadillo jumped right into some speed form stuff. If you have art skates I suspect that isn't your goal. For fitness skating it still helps to get some knee bend, but there's no need to stay really low. He also make the point that only force in the direction of 90 degrees from the direction of the wheels propel you. We can (and have) argued all day about what direction the force should be applied relative to the direction of the body, but I am in full agreement on that point. So if you kick back you have to turn the ankle.
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Old November 5th, 2014, 09:05 PM   #9
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Thank you, Armadillo, I have to admit it sounds a little complicated to me but I love this kind of information. I'll try to be mindful of what you said when I skate and keep all four wheels down (usually I just skate, but I don't pay much attention to what I'm doing with my feet )

No, my goal is not speed, I just skate for fun (for fitness too, I guess, but that's it ). I don't want to pick up bad habits or do anything that's "wrong" or that may slow my improvement in the future, but I don't mind if my technique is not perfect (as long as I don't hurt myself, or destroy my skates). I'll try to keep in mind all the suggestions next time. I finally have the new skates I ordered, and the wheels spin so much better! I haven't tried them yet, but the difference with my old skates is astonishing. Maybe I was pushing harder because the skates were crap... Can't wait to try them tomorrow.
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