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Slalom Cone Skating Forum Discussions about slalom cone skating, high-jump, and other freestyle trick skating. (Note that vert, street, and park skating discussions should be posted in our aggressive skating forum.)

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Old September 18th, 2010, 08:33 AM   #1
jojoman
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Default One leg skating, advises needed. thank you

boys and girls,

when one start pratice one leg balance skating
and
how does one prolong the duration on the act of balancing on one leg?

any advises will be welcome

Merci!
Danke!
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Old September 18th, 2010, 11:37 AM   #2
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If you already can skate one foot without cones, usually the most difficult part is to keep up the speed while maneuvering on the cones. If you skate too slow it's difficult to control the balance and accelerate and if you skate too fast it's difficult to match the correct route on the cone track. There're several factors that aid you to control the speed: the initial momentum, the foot and knee movement and the upper body movement.
You should first train the first one and the easiest, get a good running start and try to pass as many cones as you can using the initial momentum. Most likely you'll be able to pass only a few cones like that, but that's ok.
Next train the foot and knee movement. Start from a complete stop before the cone track. That is, stand on one foot without any pushing forward, and the push with the same leg you're standing on. That is achieved by putting your skate on outer or inner edge of the wheels and pushing a little with a knee. That one can be physically hard, but it's extremely useful not only for one-foots.

Also remember about the correct stand: your knee should always be bent, the free leg should be a bit in an "open" position and behind (not bent directly backwards forming a sharks fin). That leg is also aiding you to balance in transversal direction by working like a fine-grade pendulum.
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Old September 29th, 2010, 07:56 AM   #3
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Hello, I was just doing one leg today (not around cones though) I've never thought about maneuvering with them yet, maybe I'll do that tomorrow! I tried going backwards one foot though, for sure that is a very technical skill.. It feels like the moment I try to, I know I will fall back.. it doesn't feel very good ! Just thinking about how people balance on toeing or heeling.. it is very scary good.. very scary.. good.. the pros make things look so easy and smooth! But when noobies like me try it, it's like whoaa!! Maybe I can do that one day! I like that feeling! But it really makes you think, wow! They must have really put the time into doing that..

Practice, practice, practice..
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Old September 29th, 2010, 08:30 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by AwkwardTurtle View Post
Hello, I was just doing one leg today (not around cones though) I've never thought about maneuvering with them yet, maybe I'll do that tomorrow! I tried going backwards one foot though, for sure that is a very technical skill.. It feels like the moment I try to, I know I will fall back.. it doesn't feel very good ! Just thinking about how people balance on toeing or heeling.. it is very scary good.. very scary.. good.. the pros make things look so easy and smooth! But when noobies like me try it, it's like whoaa!! Maybe I can do that one day! I like that feeling! But it really makes you think, wow! They must have really put the time into doing that..

Practice, practice, practice..
One day you will find yourself being able to do it (wheelings). It comes from just practicing slalom and making yourself used to the balance needed when practicing various basic tricks.

It's not something you practice day in and out, and you can just do it, it's just something your body needs to get used to, especially since you're not on your skates 24/7.

By all means, time to time, try several attempts at wheeling, but it will come to you soon enough as your slalom progresses.
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Old September 29th, 2010, 01:26 PM   #5
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I think for wheeling tricks there's also the mental barrier that you need to break through. The thought "how can you balance on 1 wheel and not have it roll away from you" probably occurred to every slalom skater at one point or another.

Like infinity said, your body (and mind) need to get used to the balance needed for those kind of trick. Actually all the tricks, some are just more difficult than others.
Keep it up and you'll get there eventually


~~~Ron
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Old September 30th, 2010, 02:57 AM   #6
jojoman
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no trick
just balance on one leg....
why?

help in trick like T-stop.

or one leg slalom....

i find out if i use K2 softboot skate, no way i can hold for long!!!

if i wear a headboot like FR1 or metro.i can skate longer
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Old September 30th, 2010, 03:19 AM   #7
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why i love skating is because
there is always a weaker part to work on.

if u play a sport like tennis, it is always the strong hand at work.
no one would train the weak hand.

for skating, if one do t-stop on right side, you have to pratice on left-hand too.
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Old September 30th, 2010, 05:37 AM   #8
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Thumbs up Toe-Stop > T-Stop

Quote:
Originally Posted by jojoman View Post
why i love skating is because
there is always a weaker part to work on.

if u play a sport like tennis, it is always the strong hand at work.
no one would train the weak hand.

for skating, if one do t-stop on right side, you have to pratice on left-hand too.
I agree with your theory but, I believe you should learn the toe-stop instead of the T-stop because it doesn't eat your wheels. I learned about that the hard way, and now my wheels are warped (they were soft and old to begin with though :/ ). Though I still use T-stop now and then because I'm so used to the bad habit (on ginormous hills that scare the living me out of.. me?).

Also, when you're on a flat surface, try using the instep-stop too. This is one of the best ways to reduced warping your wheels. But it also takes practice, and it looks pretty weird to me when I do it lol but it works!

Here are some links:

Stepping Stop (I call it the instep stop)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLTCM...1&feature=fvwp


The toe-stop is basically a T-stop variation that doesn't kill your wheels as fast as a T-stop because it focuses on the toes rather than all your wheels. As it reads "toe" stop, you use your toe instead of all 4 wheels you're breaking with. This also adds more maneuverability for steering your stop.

EDIT: But you should learn the T-stop to get the idea of how to toe-stop.
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Old September 30th, 2010, 06:41 AM   #9
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AT,

how to do toe-stop?
any youtube video to go along?

thank you


Quote:
Originally Posted by AwkwardTurtle View Post
I agree with your theory but, I believe you should learn the toe-stop instead of the T-stop because it doesn't eat your wheels. I learned about that the hard way, and now my wheels are warped (they were soft and old to begin with though :/ ). Though I still use T-stop now and then because I'm so used to the bad habit (on ginormous hills that scare the living me out of.. me?).

Also, when you're on a flat surface, try using the instep-stop too. This is one of the best ways to reduced warping your wheels. But it also takes practice, and it looks pretty weird to me when I do it lol but it works!

Here are some links:

Stepping Stop (I call it the instep stop)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLTCM...1&feature=fvwp


The toe-stop is basically a T-stop variation that doesn't kill your wheels as fast as a T-stop because it focuses on the toes rather than all your wheels. As it reads "toe" stop, you use your toe instead of all 4 wheels you're breaking with. This also adds more maneuverability for steering your stop.

EDIT: But you should learn the T-stop to get the idea of how to toe-stop.
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Old September 30th, 2010, 06:46 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojoman View Post
AT,

how to do toe-stop?
any youtube video to go along?

thank you
Unless you want to have flat spots on your toe wheel, i suggest not bothering learning to toe stop haha xD.

Turning is the most simplest way of saving wheel.
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Old September 30th, 2010, 08:29 AM   #11
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please,........


i do spin stop until one side of the wheel need to be replace
end up i change all 8 wheel
OMG

Quote:
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Unless you want to have flat spots on your toe wheel, i suggest not bothering learning to toe stop haha xD.

Turning is the most simplest way of saving wheel.
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Old September 30th, 2010, 08:53 PM   #12
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It's better not to use your slalom wheels while doing something else than slalom at all. Of course people are often lazy to follow this rule, and I'm also among them. I found out empirically that the best way to stop and to save my slalom wheels is a stop which is something in between T-stop and barrow slide. That is, when your riding foot is well-bent forward in knee, and your sliding leg is perpendicular to the asphalt. This way you'll shave your wheels to the shape that you get after slalom sessions. But I don't use rockered wheel setup for slalom, this type of breaking would flatten your rockering.
Toe-t-stop is a possible way to save if your wheels are rockered, but it's not easy to perform technically correct. To avoid flat peeling from your wheel you have to make sure it still rotates while sliding. To achieve that you need to move it from side to side a bit, changing the skate angle relative to the riding foot. You also have to control the pressure precisely. And you get a very ineffective breaking, esp. on high speeds. So I switched to perpendicular T-stop. But you may also consider that breaking effectively is more important than saving the wheels' profile. Past few weeks I slalom in my FSK boots, with wheels all different in shape and some with flat shaves after bad slide attempts. Wheel shape (except deep flat shaves) doesn't affect slalom practice significantly unless you practice something very technical.
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Old October 8th, 2010, 07:54 AM   #13
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on my slalom skate, i cannot go too fast, very hard to brake.
on my fsk flat skate, it is much more eariler.

but it seem when i execute a move in my slalom skate well

when i go back to normal skate, it help in the skating too.
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Old October 20th, 2010, 10:45 AM   #14
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if you are interested in doing wheelings (one wheel one foot). what me and my brother did was, every time we'd go out and skate, we would just fool around and try to wheel.

it started with half a second of wheeling, and as time goes on, your half second will become 3 seconds and 3 seconds will become 6 seconds and 6 seconds will come ... and so on.

best of all, is that we never actually put effort into learning this, we'd just muck around and it feels like a no-effort spent trick :P. nowadays when we try wheeling, we'd also try and snake it for the next step, it's progressing slowly, but it's definitely going somewhere.

(my brother and I generally skate at the rink, so we have to adapt wheeling without cones. so perhaps don't focus too much on the cones under your feet, but focus more on getting the motion and feel of the move correct)
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Old October 20th, 2010, 12:52 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev0 View Post
if you are interested in doing wheelings (one wheel one foot). what me and my brother did was, every time we'd go out and skate, we would just fool around and try to wheel.

it started with half a second of wheeling, and as time goes on, your half second will become 3 seconds and 3 seconds will become 6 seconds and 6 seconds will come ... and so on.

best of all, is that we never actually put effort into learning this, we'd just muck around and it feels like a no-effort spent trick :P. nowadays when we try wheeling, we'd also try and snake it for the next step, it's progressing slowly, but it's definitely going somewhere.

(my brother and I generally skate at the rink, so we have to adapt wheeling without cones. so perhaps don't focus too much on the cones under your feet, but focus more on getting the motion and feel of the move correct)
Ya kev, thats how I got my wheeling too, just muck around =D
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Old October 21st, 2010, 07:38 AM   #16
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what i am praticing now is toe roll and use the one leg slalom.

only when better, will try to transit to one leg.
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