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Fitness Skating and Training Forum Discussions about on-skate and off-skate training, hydration, sports nutrition, weight loss, injuries, sports medicine, and other topics related to training and physical fitness for skaters.

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Old July 24th, 2010, 04:42 AM   #1
gabi
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Default How long are 84mm/80A wheels supposed to last?

Would anyone dare to guesstimate the life of 84mm/80A wheels?
I am using a pair of fairly cheap fitness skates that come with 84mm/80A wheels (made by K2-or at least with "K2" written on them). In three weeks I skated about 320km(200miles) and the wheels are now about 80mm in diameter. I am wondering how much longer I will be able to use them. I am rotating my wheels regularly, and they seem to be used quite uniformly.
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Old July 24th, 2010, 12:12 PM   #2
Bill in Houston
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Original equipment wheels are notorious for wearing out quickly, and having very poor urethane. You are doing well by rotating them often and keeping them the same size. The next set of wheels you buy will almost certainly last longer, grip better, and go faster than those.
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Old July 24th, 2010, 05:18 PM   #3
gabi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
Original equipment wheels are notorious for wearing out quickly...
Thank you for your reply, I just want to get a rough idea about what "quickly" would mean in my case.
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Old July 24th, 2010, 05:29 PM   #4
Bill in Houston
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Depending on how long you can tolerate them, and how soon they start to actually fall apart, at least 200 more miles. Maybe possibly up to 600 more if you feel lucky and aren't worried about getting hurt or stranded when they eventually fall apart. I wish I could tell you the exact answer.
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Old July 24th, 2010, 05:35 PM   #5
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Thank you, that's precise enough for my question!
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Old July 24th, 2010, 05:52 PM   #6
2old2sk8t
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gabi View Post
Thank you for your reply, I just want to get a rough idea about what "quickly" would mean in my case.
If you've worn off 4mm, it's already time to replace them (IMHO). And now at 80mm, they will wear even faster -- the smaller the wheel, the higher number of rotations per distance travelled.

Get something harder for replacement. Here's a good wheel at a good price.
http://www.adamsinline.com/close-out...-84mm-82a.html
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Last edited by 2old2sk8t; July 30th, 2010 at 10:56 AM. Reason: fixed typo
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Old July 24th, 2010, 07:16 PM   #7
gabi
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Originally Posted by 2old2sk8t View Post
...the smaller the wheel, the higher number of rotations per distance travelled....
On the other hand the smaller the wheel (because of wear), the more contact it has with the ground (a large part of the elliptical profile is gone), and that might compensate for the increased number of rotations? Who knows?

Many thanks for the link!
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Old July 30th, 2010, 09:53 AM   #8
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This is "how long is a piece of string?" question. Answer: it all depends on where and how you skate. I'd conservatively guess that 90% of my wheel wear comes from t-stopping. If you gave me a long stretch of smooth road where I could skate up and down all day and not have to worry about controlling my speed or dealing with traffic, I could easily make a set of ordinary wheels last 1,000 miles+. OTOH it's perfectly easy to trash a set of wheels in under 100 miles on something like a London->Brighton skate (a mere 54 miles) that involves lots of bad surfaces and hills where it is important to control your speed.
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