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Outdoor Quads Discussions about outdoor quad skates and any discussion relatd to skating on quad roller skatse outdoors.

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Old March 22nd, 2015, 02:45 AM   #1
RollerDiva
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Default Outdoor Skating Advice

Today was my first day skating outdoors and I had a horrible time. I went to an area that has several trails. Long story short, I ended up on a trail that had several hills and people with dogs. As I was going down a hill, I panicked! Needless to say, I ended my skating session early and went home. I want to skate outside, I really do. How can I get better and get over my fear of hills? I would love your advise.
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 02:14 AM   #2
oldspeedskater67
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I'm a very experienced skater, but not so much outdoors. I'm skating outdoor though. I would pick a trail more suitable with your skills for now. The more you skate the better you will get. My fear is hitting a rock, and crashing. Always look out in front of you. If your in an area that has debri I lean back a little, and move one skate forward and coast through it. If you hit something you will go forward, but it gives you more time transfer weight to the other skate.
Downhill if you don't want the speed, there are a few things you can do to scrub off speed. Drag one skate behind the other. "T-stop" switch skates so one leg doesn't get wore out. Swerve from side to side down the hill. I have also put the weight on one skate, put the other skate out front and run the 2 outside wheels in the grass a little. Do a 180* turn and get up on the toe stops if it gets out of control. All depends on your level of skating. I also skate where they walk dogs. Some dogs do NOT like skates.....lol. Be cautious around them.JMO
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 03:20 AM   #3
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I logged about 700 miles of city skating last year on the skates in my avatar PIC.
I call them my "Urban Warrior" metro skates. Living in Chicago, I needed a pair of skates that could handle anything, including the rare but occasional hill.

Notice the heel stops, which are at keast 3 times more effective than toe stops (unless you do a 180 before braking with toe stops). They are easy to use, as long as you can roll comfortably with only one foot down and rolling with knee bent somewhat.

Hills are now fully under control and I can allow myself to go faster without thinking I will lose it.





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Old March 23rd, 2015, 04:45 AM   #4
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I think it will just take some practice. Practice stopping, slowing, and keeping your balance when you go off- road into vegetation or dirt. Whatever you do, donít give up. Outdoor skating is the best. You described a situation that is difficult for any skater. Dogs, kids, and inattentive people will sometimes step right in front of you. Plan for the worst and hope for the best. Slow down when things get crowded and speed up when the path is clear. I recently had a dog lunge at me while skating on a sidewalk. I had no time to stop and nowhere to go but into a telephone pole. Fortunately I had slowed down as I got near, so I escaped with only a bruise and a small cut on my arm.
Oldspeedskater67 had some good advice above. Also read the poll that is eight down from here, How do you stop outdoors?
As far as hills, you might learn to like them. I actively seek them out. If wide and clear enough, I do the pavement version of the Super Giant Slalom, which is Super G fun on skates.
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 03:14 PM   #5
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Good advise from all. I am a skilled indoor skater, recently going out doors. So far just to a skate park, but intend to expand. Love the reverse plate idea and the look of your skates, Armadillo. I see a future build project for trail skates. Like is said, practice where you have room to 'learn'
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Old March 24th, 2015, 12:34 AM   #6
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Snow skiers have been doing it for as long as there have been snow skiers. Plowing in roller skates will make hills more comfortable. It's a variation of a plow stop.....you just keep going instead of stop.

People will usually clear a path for you if they hear you coming. I just yell.
Big dogs usually just want to run with you...not to be feared. Little dogs want to bite your ankles like piranha. Those normally get a Bont thrust towards them in an effort to not get bit.
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Old March 24th, 2015, 01:25 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fancy-Kerrigan View Post
Snow skiers have been doing it for as long as there have been snow skiers. Plowing in roller skates will make hills more comfortable. It's a variation of a plow stop.....you just keep going instead of stop.

People will usually clear a path for you if they hear you coming. I just yell.
Big dogs usually just want to run with you...not to be feared. Little dogs want to bite your ankles like piranha. Those normally get a Bont thrust towards them in an effort to not get bit.
Exactly the advice I would give... Snow plows. I don't like toe stops, and found snow plows to be the most effective going down hills.

As far as people and their dogs, I have the same problem. For people, I use an old fashioned bicycle bell. Great attention getter. For dogs, the opposite. Try not to draw too much attention. Just coast by slowly. Try not to make eye contact, but definitely keep an eye out.
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Old March 24th, 2015, 05:54 AM   #8
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How are your stopping skills? That answer there will ultimately dictate how good of an outdoor skater you are. Outdoors you don't always have the luxury of just "cutting crack" to avoid a path that is difficult. After all what good is the fastest sport car in the world if it has no brakes ?

You need to be able to skate with strong crossovers in either direction at your rink. Be able to plow stop HARD with a lot of grip indoors to be able to make it work outdoors. Sometimes outdoor skating offers more grip if your rink is not freshly coated and you use hard wheels. I can hockey stop either way, and make turns in either direction, forwards or backwards. With those in my arsenal of skills outdoors is pretty easy. One to not overlook though is the spin stop. Its probably my favorite stop outdoors and your not grinding the urethane off your wheels as much . We sometimes go outdoor skating, and the first time I took some rink friends outside, they went from freaking awesome to me wanting to ask "so how many times have you been skating?" Hehehe. Which brings me to this...

The other obstacle indoor skaters have to overcome is the constant possibility of terrain changes. From super rough spots to silky smooth concrete. The resistance you will feel from rougher terrain feels like its dragging your legs backs. If your feet are rolling side by side your going to eat sh!t. Use a "feeler foot". Always coast at a 1/2 step. Basically with 1 foot 6-12 inches ahead of the other. This will allow you a larger wheelbase. Keeping almost all of your weight on that forward foot at its heel, this also aids in the likelihood of your skate rolling over imperfections with the front axle. The rear axle wont cause you as many problems. Reason being is that your weight will shift forward as that foot gets hung up on your rear axle, offering it more and more opportunity to lift up over what its stuck on.
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Old March 24th, 2015, 12:18 PM   #9
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Keep up. In outdoor skating other muscles are strained compared to indoor. To build up these muscles some practice is needed. More power - better control of the skates - certainty for mastering difficult situations is growing.
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Old March 24th, 2015, 04:02 PM   #10
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All good suggestions about outdoor skills

I would add, bend your knees. Increase your speed and shorten your stroke when going through leaves, sticks, & Acorns....etc. This helps incase the skate bearing all of your weight gets hung up and suddenly stops your other skate is not too far away from your body and can save the day.

I have found that hopping, leaping, and stepping over cracks and other such things that you can't roll over to be very helpful.
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Old March 24th, 2015, 07:54 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fancy-Kerrigan View Post
All good suggestions about outdoor skills

I would add, bend your knees. Increase your speed and shorten your stroke when going through leaves, sticks, & Acorns....etc. This helps incase the skate bearing all of your weight gets hung up and suddenly stops your other skate is not too far away from your body and can save the day.

I have found that hopping, leaping, and stepping over cracks and other such things that you can't roll over to be very helpful.

I agree with the jumping/hopping over obstacles. I have a an area they tore the black top out for a drainage pipe. It is a 3" drop til it settles, and they will finish it. It is prolly 3' across. I slowed down kinda walked over at first. Then I would step one skate on it kinda quick. Now I just cruise, and Jump over it, and don't miss a beat. Full speed I have some cracks, and humps in the straight areas. Just kinda time your strides, and rock on.
No doubt you work your muscles a little different. The full left and right strides, compared to all the crossovers indoors. I have shin splints right now from skating 3 days in a row. Woke up this morning, and was like today is going to suck..lmao
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Old March 25th, 2015, 04:18 AM   #12
RollerDiva
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Wow!! I really have a lot to learn. Thank you all for your advice! I'm going to try skating outdoors again this weekend. I found another park that I think would be good for skating. I only know how to stop using my toe stops. I have my work cut out for me.
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