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Old July 8th, 2018, 05:27 AM   #1
campingnut
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Default Help me adjust my new skates

I have recently returned to skating (after a 20+ year break) and have a new set of skates I need help adjusting...Riedell 120 Fitness Deluxe boots, Suregrip Competitor plates, Suregrip Boardwalk 65mm wheels. I have skated on them 4 or 5 times outside (I have not tried them inside yet) and I have a few questions:

1. When I first start out the bottom of my feet start to cramp and I have to stop and rest often. Once Iím in the skates for 30-45 minutes the cramping goes away. Is this just the new boots, me being out of shape, or can I do something to stop this from happening?

2. How should I adjust the plates? Iím a big guy (300 lbs) and was wondering if there is a basic process to help make the skates feel better turning? Do you always adjust the front and rear bolts the same?

Thanks for the advice.
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Old July 8th, 2018, 08:03 AM   #2
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I'm not sure about the cramping, but I found success with my plates by doing the following.

1- Loosen the front and the back bolt just a little (I do the same for both).

2- Stand on a circle (usually there is some sort of circle on the floor somewhere in a rink).

3- Stand on your right foot and push off, try to get around the whole circle using just your right foot. If the truck is too loose, you will feel wobbly and feel like falling over. If the truck is not loose enough you will not be able to turn.

4- Stand on your right foot facing the opposite way and try the same thing.

Repeat the process using your left foot. Basically what you're doing is trying to get around a circle using your inside edge and again using your outside edge. It will help you feel if your trucks are too loose, or not loose enough.

Also ask the good skaters at your local rink, sometimes they will be your best resource.
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Old July 8th, 2018, 05:45 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by campingnut View Post
I have recently returned to skating (after a 20+ year break) and have a new set of skates I need help adjusting...Riedell 120 Fitness Deluxe boots, Suregrip Competitor plates, Suregrip Boardwalk 65mm wheels. I have skated on them 4 or 5 times outside (I have not tried them inside yet) and I have a few questions:

1. When I first start out the bottom of my feet start to cramp and I have to stop and rest often. Once I’m in the skates for 30-45 minutes the cramping goes away. Is this just the new boots, me being out of shape, or can I do something to stop this from happening?

2. How should I adjust the plates? I’m a big guy (300 lbs) and was wondering if there is a basic process to help make the skates feel better turning? Do you always adjust the front and rear bolts the same?

Thanks for the advice.
Need a side shot of your skates inline with the front axle. It could be a lot of things but not being able to tell anything without a pic. If you put your pic in an online site post the link and let us have a look. Sometimes a boot may be a little narrow in the front causing cramps or burning. If the plate is too far back under the boot, your feet try to clinch and that can cause cramping. If your lacing is too tight all the way down to your toes, it may be too much. I usually only tighten the upper 2 laces firm, the rest just lightly snug. If I tighten up all the way down, I get the burns all the way to my toes.
ON the truck adjustments, easy if you have reversed kingpins(nuts on the bottom below the trucks), Just loosen the nuts until the trucks move firmly by hand, trying to make them move the same amount with same approximate pressure, but not loose and floppy. With your weight, firm but with the ability to move instead of locked down would be a good starting point.
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Old July 8th, 2018, 09:54 PM   #4
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15 degree trucks, the photo indicates a click type nut on the KP, Iíd looosen the nut untill the cushions turned with finger pressure, and hunt up softer cushions for experimentation.

Your feet muscles are cramping, they will come around, Iíd suggest a trigger point roller, the wide one,

https://www.eastbay.com/product/mode...E&gclsrc=aw.ds


Roll your shins before skating, (roll your whole body) back, hips, it band, hamstrings and calves, quads, I finish up with my shins after doing the quads.

Hard orthotics will support your body weight perfectly, the muscles will be more relaxed, you will have more balance.
Googling them looks like 60$ ish bucks also, both are well spent money if you enjoy exercising.

A picture looking at the bottoms from the front to see how the plates are placed, side to side would help, or pictures.
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Old July 9th, 2018, 03:18 AM   #5
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Here are pics..







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Old July 9th, 2018, 03:30 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oicusk82huh View Post
I'm not sure about the cramping, but I found success with my plates by doing the following.

1- Loosen the front and the back bolt just a little (I do the same for both).

2- Stand on a circle (usually there is some sort of circle on the floor somewhere in a rink).

3- Stand on your right foot and push off, try to get around the whole circle using just your right foot. If the truck is too loose, you will feel wobbly and feel like falling over. If the truck is not loose enough you will not be able to turn.

4- Stand on your right foot facing the opposite way and try the same thing.

Repeat the process using your left foot. Basically what you're doing is trying to get around a circle using your inside edge and again using your outside edge. It will help you feel if your trucks are too loose, or not loose enough.

Also ask the good skaters at your local rink, sometimes they will be your best resource.
I like this idea. A circle should allow me to measure consistently.
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Old July 9th, 2018, 03:45 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by fierocious1 View Post
Sometimes a boot may be a little narrow in the front causing cramps or burning. If the plate is too far back under the boot, your feet try to clinch and that can cause cramping. If your lacing is too tight all the way down to your toes, it may be too much.
I only start cramping when Iím skating. If I sit down to rest, the cramping immediately goes away.

Quote:
I usually only tighten the upper 2 laces firm, the rest just lightly snug. If I tighten up all the way down, I get the burns all the way to my toes.
I have been tightening the laces so they are nice and snug. If I keep them loose, I do not feel like I have control. They do not hurt when I am sitting and as I said earlier, after 45 minutes or so the cramps stop. I will try to keep the lower laces looser.
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Old July 9th, 2018, 03:47 AM   #8
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Learning to bend your knees so you can shift them left/right over top of your skate GREATLY helps leverage your plates suspension.

Adding a small coating of grease at the action points , like where the cushions meet the truck yoke and where the pivot pin goes into the pivot cup.

You can also change the retainer cups to flat washers, or even undersized ones, which helps reduce the ramp up resistance so the plates continue to lean over without getting harder to turn as you trybto lean the plate more to turn more sharply

Usually SG Super cushions in purple are the same as the stock cushions in those plates, but a bit better quality as rebound goes.

Blue 72A
Yellow 79A
Purple 85A
Red 93A

There's also cone shaped cushions too. Lots of combinations.
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Old July 9th, 2018, 03:52 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by ursle View Post
Hard orthotics will support your body weight perfectly, the muscles will be more relaxed, you will have more balance.
I wear orthotics in my regular shoes, I didnít even think of trying them in my skates. I will try them...
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Old July 9th, 2018, 04:32 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by campingnut View Post
I only start cramping when Iím skating. If I sit down to rest, the cramping immediately goes away.



I have been tightening the laces so they are nice and snug. If I keep them loose, I do not feel like I have control. They do not hurt when I am sitting and as I said earlier, after 45 minutes or so the cramps stop. I will try to keep the lower laces looser.
Thats pretty much what happens when laces are too tight on my feet. Try to loosen the rest a little but keep the last two tight, but you have a tall top boot. This makes a difference. I dont lace higher than the bend of the leg at the bottom of the shin. The reason for not having control is the cushions being too tight or rock solid. Give the trucks a little movement and with a little practice it will all fall into place. It does take time to get back into skating. I wasnt smoothed back out for a year or so when I came back.
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Old July 9th, 2018, 05:34 AM   #11
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Thank you for all the advice and encouragement.
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Old July 9th, 2018, 01:18 PM   #12
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Nice photos, I was thinking more like this angle, from above or below, showing where the front of the plate is.

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Old July 10th, 2018, 12:12 AM   #13
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Default Another possibility

First of all, I agree with Mort's Super Cushion suggestion. They work great and can improve the skating experience at lot.

I had foot problems when I started back skating at age 70. Tried a lot of different things, including the arch supports. But nothing did a lot of good until my Son gave me a pair of Riedell 595 low cut boots. I had skated high top (figure) boots for all my skating life. After I mounted the low cut (See ursle's picture for an example of race boots) boots to a plate, I skated them and my feet finally found relief.

In my case, the feet did not like the weight pressing down on the front of the foot(high heel of figure boot). After skating low cut boots for a couple of years I saw a nice set of skates with high tops selling for a really good price. Nostalgia reared it's head and I purchased them. Didn't take long(one session) to learn that I may like the high tops, but my feet didn't.

All I use now are the low top (race) boots. Now my feet are the least of my problems, but that's another story. Consider renting low top skates and see if your feet feel better without a heel, but be careful. It does take a little time to get your proper balance. Once you feel comfortable with the balance, go crazy. You might enjoy the ride!

Keep Rollin
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Old July 10th, 2018, 06:01 PM   #14
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I second GraySk8ter's advice to try out some different pairs of skates. My feet cramp in my ice skates for about the first 15 minutes, and then they are fine. I don't have this issue in any of my other skates. I can suffer through 15 minutes (especially as I don't ice skate that much), but 45 minutes is a long time for cramping feet.

My ice skates do have more of a heel than any of my roller skates. I don't know if the heel of the skates is the significant factor or if something else causes the foot cramping.
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Old July 13th, 2018, 10:45 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oicusk82huh View Post
I'm not sure about the cramping, but I found success with my plates by doing the following.

1- Loosen the front and the back bolt just a little (I do the same for both).

2- Stand on a circle (usually there is some sort of circle on the floor somewhere in a rink).

3- Stand on your right foot and push off, try to get around the whole circle using just your right foot. If the truck is too loose, you will feel wobbly and feel like falling over. If the truck is not loose enough you will not be able to turn.

4- Stand on your right foot facing the opposite way and try the same thing.

Repeat the process using your left foot. Basically what you're doing is trying to get around a circle using your inside edge and again using your outside edge. It will help you feel if your trucks are too loose, or not loose enough.
I go at it the opposite way. To me it's about developing your skills to maximize your skate's performance.

The overall caveat is the trucks movement should always be constrained by cushions that are not bulging. This means no floppy loose trucks.

Loosen action or use softer cushions until your skates wobble at speed (just about as fast as you can go). Then tighten just enough until they don't. This sets the skates to your ability to control them. Try to find a setting that is about the same for both left and right. You should easily be able to go in a circle as described in the quoted post above.

If you want to have more fun you can work up to more action. Every 2,3,4 sessions (depending on your abilities) loosen the action an 1/8 turn. If the skates get wobbly at speed tighten a bit since your ability to control the skates is not there yet.

As you keep loosening, once the trucks are no longer controlled by the cushions get softer cushions. You can mix harder tops and softer bottoms. Keep going until you have mastered the softest tops and bottoms. If you hate this "knife edge" responsiveness it go back and adjust to what you like knowing you have wired your brain, nerves and muscles to handle the most response your skates can provide.

Numb toes are usually from too large a boot (toe clench) or laces too tight.

Try a skate with less or no heel. I can't imagine I'll ever go back to heeled skate boots again! They have a unnatural foot position that is mostly useful for things I don't do like jumps.

.
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Last edited by wired; July 15th, 2018 at 02:58 AM. Reason: typo
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Old July 22nd, 2018, 07:08 AM   #16
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Finally made it to the rink today with my new skates. I loosened my laces below, near the toes, and noticed a great difference in the cramps. I still forgot my orthotics...lol. Next time I am also going to try to remember to bring a socket to adjust the king pins.
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Old July 25th, 2018, 10:57 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by campingnut View Post
Finally made it to the rink today with my new skates. I loosened my laces below, near the toes, and noticed a great difference in the cramps. I still forgot my orthotics...lol. Next time I am also going to try to remember to bring a socket to adjust the king pins.
Someone at the rink should have a skate tool to loosen your kingpin nuts. It might be possible to have the heels of your boots cut down a little bit to take some of your weight off your toes
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Old July 31st, 2018, 05:04 PM   #18
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Nice photos, I was thinking more like this angle, from above or below, showing where the front of the plate is.
Here is a pic from that angle.


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Old August 1st, 2018, 01:31 AM   #19
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I found and cured the cause of my feet cramping...it was the kingpins! Once I loosened them up a bit, I was able to turn much easier and my feet did not need to work as hard. I skated today, in a rink, for 3 hours with no cramps! Yay!!!
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Old August 1st, 2018, 11:43 AM   #20
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Notice the bottom picture, the way the center of the plate is toed to the outside of the boot, not centered?
Your plate is centered, it wants to be offset to the outside, this is causing you to be off balance, and would definitely effect your foot cramping.
there's lots of info here on the log about mounting roller skate plates off-set, do a little searching, ask some questions, hopefully, it will be a fun project.
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